Emerging evidence suggests a balanced diet with a predominance of plant-based foods is associated with specific gut microbes, which are linked to a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Dr. Stéphane Schneider explains what recent studies have shown regarding the importance of taking care of what you eat for preventing or better controlling type 2 diabetes through the gut microbiome.

Research on the gut microbiome has mainly focused on bacteria, while other key microorganisms such as fungi have been largely overlooked. Learn more about the fungal microbiota’s relevance for health, how it develops across the lifespan and how you can take care of it.

Changes in the gut microbiome have been associated with conditions that cause bone loss or increase fracture risk. Learn more about the role of the gut microbiota in bone health and what today’s science says about the manipulation of the gut microbiota by oral probiotics to prevent bone loss.

Although we know how important it is to have a rich, balanced and resilient community of microorganisms in the colon in order to enjoy overall well-being and health, scientists still do not know what a healthy microbiota looks like. A new study with more than 8,000 participants sheds light on the question.

Diet variety is related to gut microbiome diversity and a greater abundance of some potentially beneficial bacteria. A new study suggests how increasing the quantity and diversity of dietary fiber intake by consuming multi-fiber bread may improve cholesterol and insulin resistance by altering gut microbiome composition and function.