Gut Microbiota Research & Practice is a section dedicated to promoting knowledge-sharing and debate among researchers, scientists and healthcare professionals. You will find a selection of discussions about articles from scientific literature as well as other content including interviews with experts, event reports, and special publications.

Beyond antibiotics, a wide range of commonly used non-antibiotic drugs can affect the gut microbiome. In addition, the gut microbiome can also influence an individual’s response to drugs by affecting their efficacy and safety. What are the implications of the bidirectional interaction between non-antibiotic drugs and the gut microbiome in the clinical setting?

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has shifted the focus of research for scientists worldwide, major breakthroughs in gut microbiome science have been made in 2020. In this last post of the year, we bring you articles from our blog that cover the major advances in the gut microbiome in 2020, from bench to bedside.

The metabolic activity of immune cells is enhanced after a viral infection, such as the one driven by COVID-19. Dietary approaches that support a healthy gut microbiome can benefit the immune system and ensure a good nutritional status that would help the host deal with pathogens.

Many studies have reported changes in gut microbiome composition in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis, when compared with healthy individuals. While that clearly raises the question about the key role played by gut microbes in IBD pathogenesis, we have yet to pinpoint the causative microbes and their mechanisms.

Does glyphosate affect the gut microbiome?

7 Dec 2020

by Andreu Prados

Gluten is not the only culprit in unwanted intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms among non-celiac individuals. Recently, the herbicide glyphosate, present in residual amounts in foods, has received a lot of attention when it comes to digestive and overall health.