Gut Microbiota Research & Practice is a section dedicated to promoting knowledge-sharing and debate among researchers, scientists and healthcare professionals. You will find a selection of discussions about articles from scientific literature as well as other content including interviews with experts, event reports, and special publications.

Thoughts about next-generation probiotics & postbiotics

6 Dec 2021

by Mary Ellen Sanders, Patrice D. Cani

Postbiotics and next-generation probiotics are emerging strategies to promote health and manage disease through targeting the human microbiome in a specific way. This article updates what is known in the field and how next-generation probiotics and postbiotics might impact on clinical practice in the foreseeable future.

Fecal microbiota transplantation is being studied in the context of metabolic health, beyond its use for recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection. A new proof-of-principle study reveals that supplementing low-fermentable fiber following fecal microbiota transplantation may improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with severe obesity.

Scientists have discovered a fungus that delays wound healing in mice and is enriched in inflamed tissue from patients with Crohn’s disease. The findings, coupled with the discovery of an engineered yeast that suppresses inflammation in a mouse model of colitis, highlights the potential of studying fungi-host interactions in IBD.

Restoring maternal microbes immediately after birth, in a practice dubbed ‘vaginal seeding’, has been suggested as a means of improving microbiome development in cesarean-born neonates. Two new studies come to contradictory findings, however, highlighting the need for more clinical trials before the practice is generalized.

While we have known for a while that a diet consisting of fiber-rich foods reduces the risk of developing chronic diseases and lowers people’s mortality rate, scientists have only recently started elucidating why fiber is beneficial for human health. This article clarifies the definition and health implications of the closely related terms fiber, MACs and prebiotics.