Gut Microbiota Research & Practice is a section dedicated to promoting knowledge-sharing and debate among researchers, scientists and healthcare professionals. You will find a selection of discussions about articles from scientific literature as well as other content including interviews with experts, event reports, and special publications.

It is largely recognized that a high-salt diet can lead to hypertension. A new randomized controlled trial reports that, particularly in females with untreated hypertension, reducing salt intake to recommended levels is linked to decreased blood pressure, more compliant blood vessels and increased serum levels of short-chain fatty acids.

Fermented foods are a known source of lactic acid bacteria. A high-throughput sequencing analysis of food and human metagenomes proves that fermented foods are a source of lactic acid bacteria for the gut microbiome, and that abundance is shaped by both age and lifestyle.

Gut microbiota alterations in obesity remain the subject of debate. Writing in Nature, Vieira-Silva and colleagues found that the undesirable Bacteroides 2 enterotype was more frequent in people with a higher body mass index, but not if they were taking statins.

The last 9th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit hold in Madrid on March updated the science behind diet, the balance between gut microbiota and the immune system, mental health, food intolerances and functional gut disorders, among others. Check out here the Summit’s official report.

Gut microbiota, with its close links to metabolism and the immune system, could potentially be a factor that lies at the core of good health. This means it can be positioned at the heart of the processes that influence the risk of contracting different diseases.