Infographics and videos
About Gut Microbiota

Healthline recently selected GMFH as one of the 9 best gut health blogs of 2020, in recognition of our position as a trusted source of evidence-based information on topics related to gut microbiota, probiotics and prebiotics, nutrition, and health.

As humans don’t consume nutrients in isolation, focusing on overall diet quality is a better way to take care of gut health. This article looks at how different dietary patterns affect your gut microbiota in terms of both known benefits and side effects.

A study, which was the largest in the field and published in JAMA Pediatrics, reveals that breastfeeding favors the implantation of a healthy gut microbiota in babies.

Stay tuned to our latest news

by subscribing to our newletters

Check our latest issues

Food 4 Gut Health news

This post takes you on a journey from the mouth to the gut microbiota and into the colon, so you can see that how you feel after a meal depends on a range of factors, including appetite, food smells and even your eating habits.

As humans don’t consume nutrients in isolation, focusing on overall diet quality is a better way to take care of gut health. This article looks at how different dietary patterns affect your gut microbiota in terms of both known benefits and side effects.

GMFH Summit 2020 - The Sessions Replay
Research & Practice

Research & Practice news

Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common disorders diagnosed by gastroenterologists. Peppermint oil, specific probiotics, psyllium supplementation, first-line IBS dietary advice, and a low FODMAP diet can aid in improving IBS symptoms.

The idea that prebiotics could be combined with probiotics to form synbiotics emerged in 1995. Now, a panel of experts under the auspices of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) updates the definition and scope of the word ‘synbiotic’.

Undernutrition still remains a major cause of death in children in some locations. A team led by Tahmeed Ahmed and Jeffrey I. Gordon have found a new driver for stunting: the bacteria that reside within the small intestine.