Infographics and videos
About Gut Microbiota

What you need to know about probiotics

23 Sep 2020

by GMFH Editing Team

Probiotics and their health benefits are often the subject of both conversations and questions. Today, GMFH’s editorial staff offers you a selection of material developed by the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) to better understand these bacteria.

This post takes you on a journey from the mouth to the gut microbiota and into the colon, so you can see that how you feel after a meal depends on a range of factors, including appetite, food smells and even your eating habits.

What is the gut-brain connection? How do the gut and the brain ‘talk’ to each other? What is the role of gut bacteria? This interview with Prof. John Cryan answers these questions.

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Food 4 Gut Health news

This post takes you on a journey from the mouth to the gut microbiota and into the colon, so you can see that how you feel after a meal depends on a range of factors, including appetite, food smells and even your eating habits.

As humans don’t consume nutrients in isolation, focusing on overall diet quality is a better way to take care of gut health. This article looks at how different dietary patterns affect your gut microbiota in terms of both known benefits and side effects.

GMFH Summit 2020 - The Sessions Replay
Research & Practice

Research & Practice news

Enteric neurons have recently emerged as a new target in the management of type 2 diabetes. The findings in mice and humans identify new intestinal bioactive compounds released after prebiotic administration, with potential for improving glucose metabolism.

The microbiota of infants born by caesarean section resembles that of maternal oral cavity and skin, whereas that of vaginally born infants resembles that of the maternal gut microbiome. A new proof-of-concept study shows that the gut microbiota of C-section-born infants can be restored after delivery via orally administered maternal fecal microbiota transplantation.

The heterogeneity of cross-sectional IBS studies has limited elucidating the gut ecosystem’s overall involvement in the disease pathogenesis. New longitudinal research that integrates multi-omics, patient and gastrointestinal data reveals previously unidentified targets that accompany changes in IBS activity.