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About Gut Microbiota

A new study suggests that the gut microbiota may be a novel avenue for exploring heart disease prevention. This article explains how a diet higher in plants and lower in animal products may decrease heart disease risk thanks to the reduction in certain metabolites produced by the gut microbiota.

A new study performed in the elderly from five European countries reveals that following a Mediterranean diet may positively affect the gut microbiota and health in this population.

A balanced gut microbiota is crucial for mental health. Learn more about how gut bacteria affect our central nervous system, even in the earliest stages of life, and how some scientists are trying to find ways of targeting the gut microbiome to improve or treat symptoms of neurological diseases.

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Food 4 Gut Health news

The gut microbiota is largely shaped by what you eat. Recently, a large study involving more than 1,000 people showed that a balanced and nutritious diet supports a healthier gut microbiota and better health, while a diet full of highly processed foods with added sugar and salt promotes a gut microbiota linked to poor metabolic health.

A new study suggests that the gut microbiota may be a novel avenue for exploring heart disease prevention. This article explains how a diet higher in plants and lower in animal products may decrease heart disease risk thanks to the reduction in certain metabolites produced by the gut microbiota.

GMFH Summit 2020 - The Sessions Replay
Research & Practice

Research & Practice news

The role of gut microbiota in shaping immune responses has led scientists to explore the modulation of the immune system as a mechanism underlying the health benefits of probiotics. A new systematic review and meta-analysis of 9 randomized clinical trials suggest probiotics may reduce the incidence of respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections in generally healthy children and adults.

Abdominal pain affects a huge amount of people nowadays, though its underlying mechanisms are not always understood. New findings in mice and humans reveal that localized immune responses against harmless foods might be involved in persistent “functional” abdominal pain.

Is it time to consider next-generation beneficial microbes for tackling obesity? APC Microbiome Ireland researchers identify Bifidobacterium longum APC1472 as a promising candidate