Research on the gut microbiome has mainly focused on bacteria, while other key microorganisms such as fungi have been largely overlooked. Learn more about the fungal microbiota’s relevance for health, how it develops across the lifespan and how you can take care of it.

Changes in the gut microbiome have been associated with conditions that cause bone loss or increase fracture risk. Learn more about the role of the gut microbiota in bone health and what today’s science says about the manipulation of the gut microbiota by oral probiotics to prevent bone loss.

November, Clostridioides difficile infection awareness month

11 Nov 2022

by Konstantina Zafeiropoulou

Just one month before friends and families gather around the Christmas table, November is here to bring awareness around Clostridioides difficile infection, and the importance of microbiota-derived treatments. With this post, all of us in GMFH aim to highlight the importance of protecting ourselves and families and stopping the spread of this potentially deadly infection.

Inflammation has been involved in the onset of chronic diseases. Probiotics emerge as a potential dietary tool for managing those conditions, partly through their role in immune system modulation and the anti-inflammatory response. Find out what is known about the anti-inflammatory effects of probiotics and their potential applications at the bedside.

Although we know how important it is to have a rich, balanced and resilient community of microorganisms in the colon in order to enjoy overall well-being and health, scientists still do not know what a healthy microbiota looks like. A new study with more than 8,000 participants sheds light on the question.

Correcting the altered gut microbiome is an important goal in Clostridioides difficile management, but the matter is not addressed by mainstream treatments with antibiotics. This article focuses on where fecal microbiota transplantation and investigational microbiota-based therapeutics stand for C. difficile infection (Part 3)

While celiac disease affects predominantly the small intestine, the contribution of the small intestinal microbiota has been largely understudied. New findings characterize the duodenal microbiota in patients with active celiac disease and explores its functional relevance.