About Andreu Prados

Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Research on the gut microbiome has mainly focused on bacteria, while other key microorganisms such as fungi have been largely overlooked. Learn more about the fungal microbiota’s relevance for health, how it develops across the lifespan and how you can take care of it.

Clostridioides difficile infection is a common cause of diarrhea in both the hospital and community settings, with C. difficile recurrence one of the most challenging outcomes to address. This article focuses on the factors that predict long-term complications of C. difficile infection and what can be done in clinical practice to minimize them (Part 5).

Changes in the gut microbiome have been associated with conditions that cause bone loss or increase fracture risk. Learn more about the role of the gut microbiota in bone health and what today’s science says about the manipulation of the gut microbiota by oral probiotics to prevent bone loss.

Inflammation has been involved in the onset of chronic diseases. Probiotics emerge as a potential dietary tool for managing those conditions, partly through their role in immune system modulation and the anti-inflammatory response. Find out what is known about the anti-inflammatory effects of probiotics and their potential applications at the bedside.

Bacteria and fungi in the human gut microbiota may contribute to the underlying mechanisms of IBS, which means the latter can be explored as a potential target for IBS. This article explores what is known about the role of the gut microbiome and yeast probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome.

Correcting the altered gut microbiome is an important goal in Clostridioides difficile management, but the matter is not addressed by mainstream treatments with antibiotics. This article focuses on where fecal microbiota transplantation and investigational microbiota-based therapeutics stand for C. difficile infection (Part 3)

Diet variety is related to gut microbiome diversity and a greater abundance of some potentially beneficial bacteria. A new study suggests how increasing the quantity and diversity of dietary fiber intake by consuming multi-fiber bread may improve cholesterol and insulin resistance by altering gut microbiome composition and function.

Patients usually ask for microbiome tests to manage gut-related issues, to find out what type of diet or food supplement fits best and to get information about the risk of developing chronic diseases. But what kind of information do microbiome tests provide and how reliable are their results for clinical practice?