GMFH 2021: The 10 most viewed articles of the year

5 Jan 2022

by GMFH Editing Team

Our selection of the most popular content of the year is already a classic and a great way to remember the important advances and new developments in our knowledge about the gut microbiota. In the case of 2021, we have been witness to some interesting debates that reinforce the gut microbiome’s impact on overall health.

As we look back, we can certainly say that 2021 has been a productive year for gut microbiome research. In this last post of the year, we bring you key articles from our blog and studies on major advances in the role of the gut microbiome in maintaining health and helping to manage gut and immune-related diseases. We will also look at the therapeutic potential of probiotics, prebiotics and postbiotics for your clinical practice.

The term synbiotic, less known than probiotics or prebiotics, was born in 1995. In 2019, a group of scientists came together to propose a new definition. Discover why synbiotics are more than simply a probiotic-prebiotic combination and how they can benefit you.

Scientists agree that having a gut microbiota that is in ‘good shape’ is a crucial component of individual health and well-being. Although exactly how ‘good shape’ is defined is not so clear, many experts recommend consuming more live dietary microbes through including fermented foods that retain live microbial components.

The role of gut microbiota in shaping immune responses has led scientists to explore the modulation of the immune system as a mechanism underlying the health benefits of probiotics. A new systematic review and meta-analysis of 9 randomized clinical trials suggest probiotics may reduce the incidence of respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections in generally healthy children and adults.

Following a diverse diet, rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fermented foods, could play a protective role against severe forms of COVID-19. A new review presents the hypothesis highlighting the link between a less diversified microbiota, a high intake of processed foods and refined sugars and severe Covid-19 cases in Western countries.