Category : Immune Health

Dr. Mimi L. K. Tang is a paediatric allergist immunologist and director of the Department of Allergy and Immunology at the Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne. She is part of the Murdoch Children's Research Institute and Associate Professor in the Department of Paediatrics at the University of Melbourne. Tang and colleagues recently published a study on co-administration of a probiotic with peanut oral…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Mimi L. K. Tang is a paediatric allergist immunologist and director of the Department of Allergy and Immunology at the Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne. She is part of the Murdoch Children's Research Institute and Associate Professor in the Department of Paediatrics at the University of Melbourne. Tang and colleagues recently published a study on co-administration of a probiotic with peanut oral…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In this paper, the first aim we had with Dr. Amandine Everard, was to investigate whether some key molecules involved in the innate immune system, mainly MyD88 [myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88], may contribute to the development of obesity, diabetes and low grade inflammation. This is not something novel, because we knew that MyD88 or Toll-like receptors are involved in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

In this paper, the first aim we had with Dr. Amandine Everard, was to investigate whether some key molecules involved in the innate immune system, mainly MyD88 [myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88], may contribute to the development of obesity, diabetes and low grade inflammation. This is not something novel, because we knew that MyD88 or Toll-like receptors are involved in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Genes contribute to the risk of celiac disease (CD), but the role of environmental factors, including perturbations in gut microbiota, is so far unclear. We recently published a review article focusing on the role of the gut microbiota in oral tolerance to food antigens. The article discusses the potential mechanisms by which the microbiota might contribute to CD. In studies comparing patients with active…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

Genes contribute to the risk of celiac disease (CD), but the role of environmental factors, including perturbations in gut microbiota, is so far unclear. We recently published a review article focusing on the role of the gut microbiota in oral tolerance to food antigens. The article discusses the potential mechanisms by which the microbiota might contribute to CD. In studies comparing patients with active…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

Neha Alang and Colleen R. Kelly recently reported that a patient who had received fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) developed obesity (1). Although it is impossible to be sure about the role of FMT in this very case, it seems wise to exclude obese donors from FMT. This 32-year-old patient required FMT for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Before FMT she…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

Neha Alang and Colleen R. Kelly recently reported that a patient who had received fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) developed obesity (1). Although it is impossible to be sure about the role of FMT in this very case, it seems wise to exclude obese donors from FMT. This 32-year-old patient required FMT for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Before FMT she…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

Dr. Faming Zhang, MD, PhD, is a doctor and researcher at the Institute for Digestive Endoscopy & Medical Center for Digestive Diseases at The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University in Nanjing, China. He is Vice Chief of the Medical Center for Digestive Diseases,  and Director of Intestinal Diseases. His research group recently published a pilot study in which they treated patients with refractory Crohn's…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Faming Zhang, MD, PhD, is a doctor and researcher at the Institute for Digestive Endoscopy & Medical Center for Digestive Diseases at The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University in Nanjing, China. He is Vice Chief of the Medical Center for Digestive Diseases,  and Director of Intestinal Diseases. His research group recently published a pilot study in which they treated patients with refractory Crohn's…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Why do some children suffer adverse vaccine events while others escape injury? What can be done to limit risk of injury by vaccination? Current CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) vaccine protocol beginning within 12 hours of birth does not factor gut microbiota as crucial to immune response. Recent study results suggest polymerase chain reaction stool testing be implemented pre-vaccination in…

Keith Bell
Keith Bell is a citizen scientist of Sanitation Circle and 25 year veteran of the recycling industry with interest in sanitation and health. During the 1980s, he was a UNICEF radio spokesperson in Chicago for the annual release of State of the World's Children Report. He’s particularly interested in gut-brain connection including gut-origin of seizure, underdiagnosed in epilepsy. Sanitation is Sanity poster Contact author: kbellrpi@gmail.com

Why do some children suffer adverse vaccine events while others escape injury? What can be done to limit risk of injury by vaccination? Current CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) vaccine protocol beginning within 12 hours of birth does not factor gut microbiota as crucial to immune response. Recent study results suggest polymerase chain reaction stool testing be implemented pre-vaccination in…

Keith Bell
Keith Bell is a citizen scientist of Sanitation Circle and 25 year veteran of the recycling industry with interest in sanitation and health. During the 1980s, he was a UNICEF radio spokesperson in Chicago for the annual release of State of the World's Children Report. He’s particularly interested in gut-brain connection including gut-origin of seizure, underdiagnosed in epilepsy. Sanitation is Sanity poster Contact author: kbellrpi@gmail.com

The Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBDs), which include Crohn's Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC) are chronic relapsing and remitting inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. The etiology of IBDs is not known yet but it is certainly multi-factorial and it includes genetic as well as environmental factors. Over the last years it has become clear, however, that IBD develops in genetically…

Marcello Romeo
Dr Marcello Romeo is currently at PHD School in Molecular and Experimental Medicine at Department of Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience at University of Palermo (Italy). His main research interest is the molecular assessment of the Human Intestinal Microbiota in health and disease and investigation of the molecular cross-talk between intestinal bacteria and Heat Shock Proteins in colon mucosa of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Colon Cancer.

The Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBDs), which include Crohn's Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC) are chronic relapsing and remitting inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. The etiology of IBDs is not known yet but it is certainly multi-factorial and it includes genetic as well as environmental factors. Over the last years it has become clear, however, that IBD develops in genetically…

Marcello Romeo
Dr Marcello Romeo is currently at PHD School in Molecular and Experimental Medicine at Department of Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience at University of Palermo (Italy). His main research interest is the molecular assessment of the Human Intestinal Microbiota in health and disease and investigation of the molecular cross-talk between intestinal bacteria and Heat Shock Proteins in colon mucosa of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Colon Cancer.

This article, published in Cell Host & Microbe, looked at human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) Envelope gp41 antibodies. (Gp41 is a protein on the surface of HIV that helps the virus invade the host's cells; it is of interest to those aiming to develop HIV vaccines.) Researchers wanted to know what shaped gp41 antibody response to HIV-1. Their findings supported…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

This article, published in Cell Host & Microbe, looked at human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) Envelope gp41 antibodies. (Gp41 is a protein on the surface of HIV that helps the virus invade the host's cells; it is of interest to those aiming to develop HIV vaccines.) Researchers wanted to know what shaped gp41 antibody response to HIV-1. Their findings supported…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

I participated in the "Targeting microbiota" congress at Pasteur Institute because I considered the topics discussed very interesting and relevant to my research. For me microbiome conferences are still a rather foreign territory, but I very much like to talk to people with a very different view from what I have. And my learning curve in the microbiome field is…

Filip Scheperjans
I am German and studied medicine at the Heinrich-Heine-University in Duesseldorf, Germany and was a visiting student at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London and at the Mount Sinai Medical School in New York. During my studies I started work on my doctoral theses in the C & U Vogt Brain Research Institute about the microscopical and neurochemical anatomy of the human parietal lobe. After graduating, I continued work on my thesis at the Institute of Medicine at the Research Center in Juelich. I received my doctoral degree and my thesis was awarded the best medical thesis in 2008 at Duesseldorf University. In 2007 I moved to Finland and started my clinical specialization in neurology. During this period I completed a 6 month fellowship in our clinical stroke research lab which gave me experience in the planning and conduction of clinical trials. I received my specialist degree in 2013.

I participated in the "Targeting microbiota" congress at Pasteur Institute because I considered the topics discussed very interesting and relevant to my research. For me microbiome conferences are still a rather foreign territory, but I very much like to talk to people with a very different view from what I have. And my learning curve in the microbiome field is…

Filip Scheperjans
I am German and studied medicine at the Heinrich-Heine-University in Duesseldorf, Germany and was a visiting student at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London and at the Mount Sinai Medical School in New York. During my studies I started work on my doctoral theses in the C & U Vogt Brain Research Institute about the microscopical and neurochemical anatomy of the human parietal lobe. After graduating, I continued work on my thesis at the Institute of Medicine at the Research Center in Juelich. I received my doctoral degree and my thesis was awarded the best medical thesis in 2008 at Duesseldorf University. In 2007 I moved to Finland and started my clinical specialization in neurology. During this period I completed a 6 month fellowship in our clinical stroke research lab which gave me experience in the planning and conduction of clinical trials. I received my specialist degree in 2013.

Prof. Stephan Schreiber is a physician, working as a gastroenterologist. He's also a director of the Clinic for Internal Medicine at Kiel Campus of the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein in Germany. His main research focus has been the molecular etiology of chronic inflammatory diseases in the gut. He accepted to give us a quick overview of his work and future challenges…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Prof. Stephan Schreiber is a physician, working as a gastroenterologist. He's also a director of the Clinic for Internal Medicine at Kiel Campus of the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein in Germany. His main research focus has been the molecular etiology of chronic inflammatory diseases in the gut. He accepted to give us a quick overview of his work and future challenges…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team