According to a new study published in Science Advances, being in contact with others may be linked to a healthy, rich and diverse microbiota, at least in chimpanzees, thus providing a healthier and longer existence.

The science of ‘butterflies in your stomach’

17 Sep 2015

by GMFH Editing Team

A recent review, published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, covered what we know so far about the gut-brain axis, and especially the role of the hundreds of trillions of microorganisms in the digestive tract.

A team of scientists led by Premysl Bercik, Associate Professor of Medicine at McMaster’s Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, carried out two sets of experiments with mice with the goal of studying the effect of gut microbiota on behaviour in an established model of anxiety and depression.

Gut microbiota may play a role in autism

9 Apr 2015

by GMFH Editing Team

Although a range of factors are usually considered, the exact cause of these anomalies is unknown. Recent research carried out by scientists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and published in the journal Cell seems to shed some light on the origin of the condition, which, it appears may be linked to changes in the gut microbiota.

For the study’s principal researcher, Professor Sven Pettersson of the Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology at Karolinska Institutet, “Given that the microbiota’s composition and diversity change over time, it is tempting to speculate that the blood brain-barrier’s integrity may also fluctuate depending on the microbiota.”