In a study just published in the journal Translational Psychiatry, researchers from the French National Research Institute (INSERM – Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale) and the University of Rouen claimed to have discovered some bacteria in the gut that may interfere with the way the body regulates effectively appetite, at least in rodents. 

Some months ago, California welcomed the TEDxCaltech: The Brain conference, where experts from different areas discussed a range of issues about the brain and the future of neuroscience. At one of the sessions, Elaine Hsiao, PhD in Microbiology from the California

It is often said that “we are what we eat” and, as research into the relationship between diet and the gut microbiota progresses, the expression becomes even more meaningful. It is well known that a diet rich in live cultures

I have a (gut) feeling…

12 Nov 2012

by GMFH Editing Team

It is well known that brain levels of serotonin (also called the “happy hormone” as it is the major chemical involved in the regulation of mood and emotion) are altered in times of anxiety, depression, stress or excitement. However, a