Category : Diet

Studies from the past few years have shown gut microbiota is implicated in numerous health conditions, such as obesity, allergies and asthma, as well as colon cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s. Animal studies have shown the key role gut microbiota plays in training and maintaining proper function of the immune system, and also in maintaining good metabolic function. These studies…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Studies from the past few years have shown gut microbiota is implicated in numerous health conditions, such as obesity, allergies and asthma, as well as colon cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s. Animal studies have shown the key role gut microbiota plays in training and maintaining proper function of the immune system, and also in maintaining good metabolic function. These studies…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

In the past decades, some studies have shed light on the importance of diet in reducing the risk of cancer. More and more evidence is accumulating that gut microbiota could be involved in this relationship between food and disease. A senior investigator at the National Cancer Institute (USA), Rashmi Sinha studies the link between what we eat, our health and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

In the past decades, some studies have shed light on the importance of diet in reducing the risk of cancer. More and more evidence is accumulating that gut microbiota could be involved in this relationship between food and disease. A senior investigator at the National Cancer Institute (USA), Rashmi Sinha studies the link between what we eat, our health and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Whether it's chicken soup to help fight a cold or garlic to fortify against the flu, tradition has it that food can influence our immune response. But does this idea hold up scientifically? According to Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK) and winner of the Danone International Prize for Nutrition, growing evidence shows…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Whether it's chicken soup to help fight a cold or garlic to fortify against the flu, tradition has it that food can influence our immune response. But does this idea hold up scientifically? According to Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK) and winner of the Danone International Prize for Nutrition, growing evidence shows…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

You may already know that a more diverse gut microbiota is linked to better general health. And when you think of what you can eat to boost microbial diversity, you might be thinking about fruit, veggies, and whole grain foods. If so, you are completely correct: these are all excellent choices for taking good care of your gut microbial community.…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

You may already know that a more diverse gut microbiota is linked to better general health. And when you think of what you can eat to boost microbial diversity, you might be thinking about fruit, veggies, and whole grain foods. If so, you are completely correct: these are all excellent choices for taking good care of your gut microbial community.…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

When you consume dietary fibers, it is not your body that breaks them down—it’s the bacteria in your large intestine! Important molecules produced by this bacterial activity are called short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which comprise a maximum of six carbon atoms along with atoms of oxygen and hydrogen. Your body absorbs around 95% of these SCFAs and puts them to…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

When you consume dietary fibers, it is not your body that breaks them down—it’s the bacteria in your large intestine! Important molecules produced by this bacterial activity are called short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which comprise a maximum of six carbon atoms along with atoms of oxygen and hydrogen. Your body absorbs around 95% of these SCFAs and puts them to…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The power of food to impact your health is not a new idea, but it is only with emerging research on the human gut microbiota that scientists are beginning to understand exactly how this happens. Whether you eat a strawberry or a hamburger, the food components enter your digestive system and encounter the intestinal microbes. Through a series of complex…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The power of food to impact your health is not a new idea, but it is only with emerging research on the human gut microbiota that scientists are beginning to understand exactly how this happens. Whether you eat a strawberry or a hamburger, the food components enter your digestive system and encounter the intestinal microbes. Through a series of complex…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Every time you eat whole grains, fresh fruit and vegetables - foods very rich in dietary fibre, which is a type of carbohydrate present in plants - you are not only taking care of your health, but also nourishing some of the trillion microbes inhabiting your gut that, in turn, take care of you. And as a new study suggests,…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Every time you eat whole grains, fresh fruit and vegetables - foods very rich in dietary fibre, which is a type of carbohydrate present in plants - you are not only taking care of your health, but also nourishing some of the trillion microbes inhabiting your gut that, in turn, take care of you. And as a new study suggests,…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Ever wonder why the diet your doctor prescribed, which you followed for several months, failed to work despite all your efforts? Or why although you eat healthily you can’t lose a measly pound while your gym mates are all slimming down? Researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel have now discovered and proven for the first time the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Ever wonder why the diet your doctor prescribed, which you followed for several months, failed to work despite all your efforts? Or why although you eat healthily you can’t lose a measly pound while your gym mates are all slimming down? Researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel have now discovered and proven for the first time the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Since ancient times, many cultures around the world have included foods rich in microbes - friendly bacteria able to give a helping hand to our microbiota and overall health – in their traditional diet. Scientists are starting to better understand the role of these microorganisms and how they can have a positive impact on the health of our gut. At…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Since ancient times, many cultures around the world have included foods rich in microbes - friendly bacteria able to give a helping hand to our microbiota and overall health – in their traditional diet. Scientists are starting to better understand the role of these microorganisms and how they can have a positive impact on the health of our gut. At…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Professor of Nutrition, Director of the Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition (ICAN) linked to the University of Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris and head of a research group at INSERM; it is no surprise that Karine Clément is a well-known expert in metabolic diseases, nutrition and the role the gut microbiota plays in these conditions. Last year, she received…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Professor of Nutrition, Director of the Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition (ICAN) linked to the University of Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris and head of a research group at INSERM; it is no surprise that Karine Clément is a well-known expert in metabolic diseases, nutrition and the role the gut microbiota plays in these conditions. Last year, she received…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team