Research on the gut microbiome has mainly focused on bacteria, while other key microorganisms such as fungi have been largely overlooked. Learn more about the fungal microbiota’s relevance for health, how it develops across the lifespan and how you can take care of it.

Clostridioides difficile infection is a common cause of diarrhea in both the hospital and community settings, with C. difficile recurrence one of the most challenging outcomes to address. This article focuses on the factors that predict long-term complications of C. difficile infection and what can be done in clinical practice to minimize them (Part 5).

Changes in the gut microbiome have been associated with conditions that cause bone loss or increase fracture risk. Learn more about the role of the gut microbiota in bone health and what today’s science says about the manipulation of the gut microbiota by oral probiotics to prevent bone loss.

Bacterial extracellular vesicles: future postbiotics?

18 Oct 2022

by Konstantina Zafeiropoulou

Research into microbial extracellular vesicles has progressed significantly over several decades. Following up on the 1989 breakthrough that bacterial extracellular vesicles contain genetic information, and the recent ISAPP definition on postbiotics, current research suggests bacterial extracellular vesicles derived from probiotic bacteria may be the postbiotics of the future with potential health benefits.

Bacteria and fungi in the human gut microbiota may contribute to the underlying mechanisms of IBS, which means the latter can be explored as a potential target for IBS. This article explores what is known about the role of the gut microbiome and yeast probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome.

Although we know how important it is to have a rich, balanced and resilient community of microorganisms in the colon in order to enjoy overall well-being and health, scientists still do not know what a healthy microbiota looks like. A new study with more than 8,000 participants sheds light on the question.

Diet variety is related to gut microbiome diversity and a greater abundance of some potentially beneficial bacteria. A new study suggests how increasing the quantity and diversity of dietary fiber intake by consuming multi-fiber bread may improve cholesterol and insulin resistance by altering gut microbiome composition and function.