Bioaccumulation: a new perspective in the drug-bug story

24 Jan 2022

by Konstantina Zafeiropoulou

In Western world, the incidence of autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases has been significantly increasing and also the use of non-antibiotic drugs for their treatment. Scientists at EMBL and Cambridge University elucidate how common drugs accumulate in gut bacteria and potentially reduce medication’s effectiveness.

As we look back, we can certainly say that 2021 has been a productive year for gut microbiome research. In this last post of the year, we bring you key articles from our blog and studies on major advances in the role of the gut microbiome in maintaining health and helping to manage gut and immune-related diseases. We will also look at the therapeutic potential of probiotics, prebiotics and postbiotics for your clinical practice.

Gut health benefits begin in pregnancy

10 Nov 2021

by Cristina Sáez

Assumed for a long-time immune system training started after birth, when mom’s microbiota started colonizing the newborn, Yale University scientists point out that process may have begun much earlier, in utero.

Scientists have discovered a fungus that delays wound healing in mice and is enriched in inflamed tissue from patients with Crohn’s disease. The findings, coupled with the discovery of an engineered yeast that suppresses inflammation in a mouse model of colitis, highlights the potential of studying fungi-host interactions in IBD.

Restoring maternal microbes immediately after birth, in a practice dubbed ‘vaginal seeding’, has been suggested as a means of improving microbiome development in cesarean-born neonates. Two new studies come to contradictory findings, however, highlighting the need for more clinical trials before the practice is generalized.

Little is known about the relationship between diet, the composition and function of the gut microbiota and clinical symptoms of IBS. New findings identify how IBS symptom severity is related to a higher intake of foods with poor nutritional quality and gut microbiome features at both subspecies level and metabolic pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism.