Scientists have discovered a fungus that delays wound healing in mice and is enriched in inflamed tissue from patients with Crohn’s disease. The findings, coupled with the discovery of an engineered yeast that suppresses inflammation in a mouse model of colitis, highlights the potential of studying fungi-host interactions in IBD.

Restoring maternal microbes immediately after birth, in a practice dubbed ‘vaginal seeding’, has been suggested as a means of improving microbiome development in cesarean-born neonates. Two new studies come to contradictory findings, however, highlighting the need for more clinical trials before the practice is generalized.

Little is known about the relationship between diet, the composition and function of the gut microbiota and clinical symptoms of IBS. New findings identify how IBS symptom severity is related to a higher intake of foods with poor nutritional quality and gut microbiome features at both subspecies level and metabolic pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism.

Beyond live microorganisms, inanimate microorganisms and their components can also confer a health benefit on the host. A panel of experts under the auspices of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) updates the definition and scope of postbiotics.