Category : Type 1 Diabetes

Over the past decade of studying the gut microbiome, we have learned that environmental factors related to diet and drugs are major determinants of gut microbiota composition and that their effects outweigh the influence of genetics. The GMFH publishing team is pleased to share a new summary document on the latest evidence regarding the influencing role of diet and probiotics…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Over the past decade of studying the gut microbiome, we have learned that environmental factors related to diet and drugs are major determinants of gut microbiota composition and that their effects outweigh the influence of genetics. The GMFH publishing team is pleased to share a new summary document on the latest evidence regarding the influencing role of diet and probiotics…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Previous research has suggested the gut microbiota's role in the risk of developing metabolic and immune-related disorders later in life. However, no studies have characterized the early-life gut microbiome longitudinally in large populations. Three recent studies shed light on how early-life gut microbiota composition might help identify which children are at risk of developing obesity and type 1 diabetes later…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has suggested the gut microbiota's role in the risk of developing metabolic and immune-related disorders later in life. However, no studies have characterized the early-life gut microbiome longitudinally in large populations. Three recent studies shed light on how early-life gut microbiota composition might help identify which children are at risk of developing obesity and type 1 diabetes later…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Regular and adequate levels of physical exercise help protect against several diseases and all-cause mortality. One of the mechanisms that has been gaining increasing attention in relation to how exercise impacts health outcomes is the favorable modification of the human gut microbiota. Although research in this field is still scarce, previous animal and human research findings showed that exercise can…

Stéphane Schneider
Professor Stéphane Schneider heads the Nutritional Support Unit in the Gastroenterology and Nutrition Department Archet University Hospital in Nice (France). He is also head of the Nice University Hospital’s food-nutrition liaison committee. Dr. Schneider is vice-president of the French-Speaking Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP), and chairs the Educational and Clinical Practice Committee of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Three years after receiving his M.D. in Gastroenterology from the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, he became an assistant Professor and later a full Professor of Nutrition. He is also certified by the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He obtained a Master of Science from the University of Paris VII, and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University Paul Cezanne, as well as a CME Diploma from Harvard Medical School. His main research interests are intestinal failure and the effects of aging and chronic diseases on nutritional status. He has published 188 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, with an h index of 37. His goal is to help understand better the role of the intestinal ecosystem, as well as the effects of different forms of bacteriotherapy, in digestive and non-digestive disorders featuring dysbiosis.

Regular and adequate levels of physical exercise help protect against several diseases and all-cause mortality. One of the mechanisms that has been gaining increasing attention in relation to how exercise impacts health outcomes is the favorable modification of the human gut microbiota. Although research in this field is still scarce, previous animal and human research findings showed that exercise can…

Stéphane Schneider
Professor Stéphane Schneider heads the Nutritional Support Unit in the Gastroenterology and Nutrition Department Archet University Hospital in Nice (France). He is also head of the Nice University Hospital’s food-nutrition liaison committee. Dr. Schneider is vice-president of the French-Speaking Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP), and chairs the Educational and Clinical Practice Committee of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Three years after receiving his M.D. in Gastroenterology from the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, he became an assistant Professor and later a full Professor of Nutrition. He is also certified by the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He obtained a Master of Science from the University of Paris VII, and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University Paul Cezanne, as well as a CME Diploma from Harvard Medical School. His main research interests are intestinal failure and the effects of aging and chronic diseases on nutritional status. He has published 188 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, with an h index of 37. His goal is to help understand better the role of the intestinal ecosystem, as well as the effects of different forms of bacteriotherapy, in digestive and non-digestive disorders featuring dysbiosis.

Recent research has shed light on the importance of gut microbiota both during pregnancy and early life. Despite recent research that shows the placenta is not sterile, as previously thought, gut microbiota colonization in the first days and weeks after birth appears to have enormous significance for post-natal life, says Professor Olivier Goulet, from Hospital Necker-Enfants Malades (Paris, France). According…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Recent research has shed light on the importance of gut microbiota both during pregnancy and early life. Despite recent research that shows the placenta is not sterile, as previously thought, gut microbiota colonization in the first days and weeks after birth appears to have enormous significance for post-natal life, says Professor Olivier Goulet, from Hospital Necker-Enfants Malades (Paris, France). According…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) incidence is increasing worldwide, with decreasing age of onset, suggesting that early-life environmental exposures may be involved. The first 3 years of life (also termed a ‘window of opportunity’) may represent the most critical period for dietary interventions aimed at gut microbiota modulation for improving child growth and development. In this context, disruption of early-life interactions…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) incidence is increasing worldwide, with decreasing age of onset, suggesting that early-life environmental exposures may be involved. The first 3 years of life (also termed a ‘window of opportunity’) may represent the most critical period for dietary interventions aimed at gut microbiota modulation for improving child growth and development. In this context, disruption of early-life interactions…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It has been previously reported that the gut microbiota could be involved in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases such as diabetes. A recent study, led by Dr. Wolfgang zu Castell from the Scientific Computing Research Unit at Helmholtz Zentrum München in Munich (Germany) has found that butyrate may have a protective effect in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes.  …

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It has been previously reported that the gut microbiota could be involved in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases such as diabetes. A recent study, led by Dr. Wolfgang zu Castell from the Scientific Computing Research Unit at Helmholtz Zentrum München in Munich (Germany) has found that butyrate may have a protective effect in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes.  …

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A long-term goal of gut microbiota research is to find a method of normalizing the microbiota early in life and sustaining it though the lifespan. Researchers from Alabama, USA, have found a method of doing this in mice. They found that cross-fostering -- giving pups to a nursing non-birth mother -- permanently shifted the pups' microbiota composition. The study examined…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

A long-term goal of gut microbiota research is to find a method of normalizing the microbiota early in life and sustaining it though the lifespan. Researchers from Alabama, USA, have found a method of doing this in mice. They found that cross-fostering -- giving pups to a nursing non-birth mother -- permanently shifted the pups' microbiota composition. The study examined…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In this paper, the first aim we had with Dr. Amandine Everard, was to investigate whether some key molecules involved in the innate immune system, mainly MyD88 [myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88], may contribute to the development of obesity, diabetes and low grade inflammation. This is not something novel, because we knew that MyD88 or Toll-like receptors are involved in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

In this paper, the first aim we had with Dr. Amandine Everard, was to investigate whether some key molecules involved in the innate immune system, mainly MyD88 [myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88], may contribute to the development of obesity, diabetes and low grade inflammation. This is not something novel, because we knew that MyD88 or Toll-like receptors are involved in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.