Category : Dysbiosis

At the occasion of the "New therapies in coeliac disease" conference hosted by Columbia University in New-York on March 20, 2014, Dr. Elena Verdú, our expert in Nutrition, is sharing with us the last trends in research in the field of Coeliac Disease (CeD), introducing the idea of a role of probiotics in the treatment of CeD. Presence of intestinal dysbiosis…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

At the occasion of the "New therapies in coeliac disease" conference hosted by Columbia University in New-York on March 20, 2014, Dr. Elena Verdú, our expert in Nutrition, is sharing with us the last trends in research in the field of Coeliac Disease (CeD), introducing the idea of a role of probiotics in the treatment of CeD. Presence of intestinal dysbiosis…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

Machiels et al. recently described that the composition of the faecal microbiota of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis differs from that of healthy individuals: they found a reduction in two well-known butyrate-producing bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, Roseburia hominis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. This has been confirmed in other studies. The dysbiosis found in the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) i.e. Crohn’s…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

Machiels et al. recently described that the composition of the faecal microbiota of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis differs from that of healthy individuals: they found a reduction in two well-known butyrate-producing bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, Roseburia hominis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. This has been confirmed in other studies. The dysbiosis found in the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) i.e. Crohn’s…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

Speakers: Dirk Haller (Germany), Balfour Sartor (USA)   Prof. Haller started his presentation by pointing out that “dysbiosis” is not a good term, because nobody knows what dysbiosis really means. To be able to understand what dysbiosis is, you would have to understand what the normal status quo is, and according to Prof. Haller that is not really well established.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Speakers: Dirk Haller (Germany), Balfour Sartor (USA)   Prof. Haller started his presentation by pointing out that “dysbiosis” is not a good term, because nobody knows what dysbiosis really means. To be able to understand what dysbiosis is, you would have to understand what the normal status quo is, and according to Prof. Haller that is not really well established.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

(27 February 2013) Although considerable progress has been made in determining the impact of the gut microbiota on the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, the detailed study and understanding of the composition and effects of this intestinal community still faces numerous methodological and empirical challenges. “Improvement of study design and sample collection, as well…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

(27 February 2013) Although considerable progress has been made in determining the impact of the gut microbiota on the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, the detailed study and understanding of the composition and effects of this intestinal community still faces numerous methodological and empirical challenges. “Improvement of study design and sample collection, as well…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Stool transplants highly efficient for Clostridium difficile infections and other gastrointestinal conditions — online press conference at 2nd World Summit “Gut Microbiota For Health” held today (26 February 2013) Clostridium difficile infections have developed into a virtual pandemic over the past two decades. The outcome of standard antibiotic treatment is unsatisfactory: the recurrence rates are high with every relapse increasing…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Stool transplants highly efficient for Clostridium difficile infections and other gastrointestinal conditions — online press conference at 2nd World Summit “Gut Microbiota For Health” held today (26 February 2013) Clostridium difficile infections have developed into a virtual pandemic over the past two decades. The outcome of standard antibiotic treatment is unsatisfactory: the recurrence rates are high with every relapse increasing…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team