Gut Microbiota Research & Practice is a section dedicated to promoting knowledge-sharing and debate among researchers, scientists and healthcare professionals. You will find a selection of discussions about articles from scientific literature as well as other content including interviews with experts, event reports, and special publications.

Despite the global focus on COVID-19, 2021 was also a productive year in gut microbiome research. In this “2021 Year at a glance” report, discover emerging trends in postbiotics, the role of beneficial microbes in dietary guidelines, diet-related tools for shaping the gut microbiome and the potential role of newly identified probiotics in obesity and functional dyspepsia.

As we look back, we can certainly say that 2021 has been a productive year for gut microbiome research. In this last post of the year, we bring you key articles from our blog and studies on major advances in the role of the gut microbiome in maintaining health and helping to manage gut and immune-related diseases. We will also look at the therapeutic potential of probiotics, prebiotics and postbiotics for your clinical practice.

The 10th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit will take place on March 12 and 13 2022 in Washington D.C., USA and via livestream. Discover the scientific program and workshop sessions, which focus on the uniqueness of our gut microbiomes and advances in personalized approaches to modifying the gut microbiome for promoting health and mitigating disease.

Fecal microbiota transplantation is being studied in the context of metabolic health, beyond its use for recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection. A new proof-of-principle study reveals that supplementing low-fermentable fiber following fecal microbiota transplantation may improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with severe obesity.

Scientists have discovered a fungus that delays wound healing in mice and is enriched in inflamed tissue from patients with Crohn’s disease. The findings, coupled with the discovery of an engineered yeast that suppresses inflammation in a mouse model of colitis, highlights the potential of studying fungi-host interactions in IBD.