Category : News Watch

Who can go to Naples without indulging in pizza? To Jamaica without eating the spicy jerk chicken, or to Mexico without eating the local enchiladas? Part of the joy of summer travel is the new culinary experiences, of course. But what are the consequences of adopting a diet that's so different from your everyday eating habits? From the evidence to…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Who can go to Naples without indulging in pizza? To Jamaica without eating the spicy jerk chicken, or to Mexico without eating the local enchiladas? Part of the joy of summer travel is the new culinary experiences, of course. But what are the consequences of adopting a diet that's so different from your everyday eating habits? From the evidence to…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

When you fall in love and you feel butterflies in your stomach; or when you are nervous before an exam and you have a stomachache: gut feelings are real. Although the scientific link between the gut and emotions is unknown, increasing evidence suggests that the microbiota may have a role in gut-brain communication. And now, in healthy humans, researchers have…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

When you fall in love and you feel butterflies in your stomach; or when you are nervous before an exam and you have a stomachache: gut feelings are real. Although the scientific link between the gut and emotions is unknown, increasing evidence suggests that the microbiota may have a role in gut-brain communication. And now, in healthy humans, researchers have…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

There’s no such thing as one-size-fits-all nutrition. In 2015, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel laid the foundation for this statement with an article that proved that each of us metabolises food differently due, in part, to gut microbiota. Researcher Niv Zmora explained to Gut Microbiota for Health the main results of that study during the GMFH…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

There’s no such thing as one-size-fits-all nutrition. In 2015, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel laid the foundation for this statement with an article that proved that each of us metabolises food differently due, in part, to gut microbiota. Researcher Niv Zmora explained to Gut Microbiota for Health the main results of that study during the GMFH…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

For many years, humans have known that bacteria and other microorganisms are capable of transforming food substrates, making them both tasty and nutritious. More and more, chefs and other food-makers are putting bacteria to work to produce fermented foods. With delicious results. Besides flavour, though, are there other reasons to seek out fermented foods? Scientists around the world are trying…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

For many years, humans have known that bacteria and other microorganisms are capable of transforming food substrates, making them both tasty and nutritious. More and more, chefs and other food-makers are putting bacteria to work to produce fermented foods. With delicious results. Besides flavour, though, are there other reasons to seek out fermented foods? Scientists around the world are trying…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

“Free” diets are in fashion. In supermarkets tens of products labeled gluten-free or lactose-free can be easily found; there are more and more cafes, ice-cream shops, bakeries, restaurants offering special menus, where those two components have been banished. According to the Celiac Disease Foundation, celiac disease affects 1 in 100 people worldwide; in the case of lactose intolerance, it is…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

“Free” diets are in fashion. In supermarkets tens of products labeled gluten-free or lactose-free can be easily found; there are more and more cafes, ice-cream shops, bakeries, restaurants offering special menus, where those two components have been banished. According to the Celiac Disease Foundation, celiac disease affects 1 in 100 people worldwide; in the case of lactose intolerance, it is…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Alisa had to pack up and move while she was eight months pregnant—a stressful undertaking even without bearing an extra 25 pounds and an inability to tie her own shoes. But luckily, her best friend stepped in. As Alisa reports, “My bestie helped to pack up well over half my house as well as scrubbed the [entire] new home we…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Alisa had to pack up and move while she was eight months pregnant—a stressful undertaking even without bearing an extra 25 pounds and an inability to tie her own shoes. But luckily, her best friend stepped in. As Alisa reports, “My bestie helped to pack up well over half my house as well as scrubbed the [entire] new home we…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Advertisements for the various health benefits of different probiotics —for digestive problems but also beyond the gut— are everywhere these days. But do probiotics really work? A new study published in the journal Gastroenterology showed that a specific probiotic can help to treat symptoms of depression in patients who suffer from a common gastrointestinal disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (or IBS).…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Advertisements for the various health benefits of different probiotics —for digestive problems but also beyond the gut— are everywhere these days. But do probiotics really work? A new study published in the journal Gastroenterology showed that a specific probiotic can help to treat symptoms of depression in patients who suffer from a common gastrointestinal disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (or IBS).…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

The past five years have been an especially rapid time of discovery, thanks to scientists studying the gut microbiota and how it influences the gut-brain axis—the two-way communication channel between the digestive tract and the brain. Not only are links being made between gut microbiota composition and conditions like depression and anxiety, but the gut also shows potential for revealing…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The past five years have been an especially rapid time of discovery, thanks to scientists studying the gut microbiota and how it influences the gut-brain axis—the two-way communication channel between the digestive tract and the brain. Not only are links being made between gut microbiota composition and conditions like depression and anxiety, but the gut also shows potential for revealing…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Blurred or double vision; numbness in the arms, legs, or face; problems with balance when walking. These are some of the first symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease that affects 2.3 million people worldwide, most of whom are women around 30 years old. There is currently no cure—nor are the causes known. We do know,…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Blurred or double vision; numbness in the arms, legs, or face; problems with balance when walking. These are some of the first symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease that affects 2.3 million people worldwide, most of whom are women around 30 years old. There is currently no cure—nor are the causes known. We do know,…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina