Tag Archives: lactobacillus

Salt is all over our plates, in bread, ham, cheese and almost all processed foods. We tend to exceed the recommended amount of sodium intake per day, which according to the World Health Organization, is 5 grams and we also know that eating too much salt is related to cardiovascular diseases. Now, scientists may have discovered the reason behind this…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Salt is all over our plates, in bread, ham, cheese and almost all processed foods. We tend to exceed the recommended amount of sodium intake per day, which according to the World Health Organization, is 5 grams and we also know that eating too much salt is related to cardiovascular diseases. Now, scientists may have discovered the reason behind this…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Probiotics have a range of documented effects on human health, with hundreds of studies from the past several decades showing their ability to alter physical or behavioural phenotypes in humans. These human efficacy trials provide the necessary evidence to guide probiotic use. In designing a trial, however, the researchers often wonder how to select the best strain for the task…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Probiotics have a range of documented effects on human health, with hundreds of studies from the past several decades showing their ability to alter physical or behavioural phenotypes in humans. These human efficacy trials provide the necessary evidence to guide probiotic use. In designing a trial, however, the researchers often wonder how to select the best strain for the task…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

A recent study led by Dr. Luis Fontana (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, Granada, Spain) has found that administration of Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 may downregulate gut inflammatory genes in obese rats. Rats were divided into various…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A recent study led by Dr. Luis Fontana (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, Granada, Spain) has found that administration of Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 may downregulate gut inflammatory genes in obese rats. Rats were divided into various…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The intestinal epithelium is considered a novel target for addressing several acute and chronic gastrointestinal conditions. It also could have a potential role in targeting systemic diseases. It is an active component of the mucosal immune system. When considering the complex ecosystem combining the gastrointestinal epithelium, immune cells and resident microbiota, several probiotics like Lactobacillus fermentum exhibit immunoregulatory effects in…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The intestinal epithelium is considered a novel target for addressing several acute and chronic gastrointestinal conditions. It also could have a potential role in targeting systemic diseases. It is an active component of the mucosal immune system. When considering the complex ecosystem combining the gastrointestinal epithelium, immune cells and resident microbiota, several probiotics like Lactobacillus fermentum exhibit immunoregulatory effects in…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Food is essential in our lives. It is unthinkable to have a family celebration without a delicious feast in front of us; most of the time we meet friends around a table, and we try to taste local dishes and culinary specialties when traveling abroad. Emotional aspects, as well as culture, memories, and also nutritional needs mediate our food choices…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Food is essential in our lives. It is unthinkable to have a family celebration without a delicious feast in front of us; most of the time we meet friends around a table, and we try to taste local dishes and culinary specialties when traveling abroad. Emotional aspects, as well as culture, memories, and also nutritional needs mediate our food choices…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

In countries where parents have access to modern medical care, they bring a new baby to regular checkups through its first years of life. The parents proudly report the milestones: clapping, crawling, drinking from a cup—and of course, medical staff carefully track the baby’s growth. But in some places and for some children, the steady upward slant on the growth…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In countries where parents have access to modern medical care, they bring a new baby to regular checkups through its first years of life. The parents proudly report the milestones: clapping, crawling, drinking from a cup—and of course, medical staff carefully track the baby’s growth. But in some places and for some children, the steady upward slant on the growth…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter