Scientists agree that having a gut microbiota that is in ‘good shape’ is a crucial component of individual health and well-being. Although exactly how ‘good shape’ is defined is not so clear, many experts recommend consuming more live dietary microbes through including fermented foods that retain live microbial components.

Our Top 10 2020 gut microbiota articles

5 Jan 2021

by GMFH Editing Team

This year’s research has brought to light many interesting advances in the field of gut health and has unveiled some of the microbiota’s secrets. We have discussed the impact of diet, immunity, fermented foods, the characteristics of gut health, and of course we also covered COVID-19. So, can you guess what GMFH’s 10 most popular articles of 2020 were?

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has shifted the focus of research for scientists worldwide, major breakthroughs in gut microbiome science have been made in 2020. In this last post of the year, we bring you articles from our blog that cover the major advances in the gut microbiome in 2020, from bench to bedside.

Fermented foods are an increasing focus of interest for both scientists and consumers. Few modern foods are a significant source of live microbes, and fermented foods can be the exception. What do we know about how those dietary microbes impact our gut microbiota and our health?

Fermented foods are trendy and consuming them is good for your gut health. Learn more about the science behind fermented foods, their beneficial effects, and why not all qualify as probiotics.

4 basics facts about fermented foods

2 Nov 2020

by GMFH Editing Team

From sourdough bread to kefir, fermented foods are a hot topic! But do you know exactly where they come from or what their benefits are and what is their link to the gut microbiota?

What you need to know about probiotics

23 Sep 2020

by GMFH Editing Team

Probiotics and their health benefits are often the subject of both conversations and questions. Today, GMFH’s editorial staff offers you a selection of material developed by the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) to better understand these bacteria.