Your microbes, your health

Science’s editors named “Our Microbes, Our Health” as runner-up for Breakthrough of the Year 2013.

 

This Science Magazine “News” article highlighted some studies on gut microbiota, published in several magazines in 2013. It represented a good collection of some of the most important findings involving microbioma and health. Among the selected topics, we could find studies connecting gut microbiota with malnutrition, cancer or diabetes. In particular, the editors focused attention on several articles that explored (1) the relationship of kidney stones, milk formula tainted with melamine and Klebsiella; (2) how a malnutrition syndrome, called Kwashiorkor, was related to a fewer maturation of microbial composition in malnourished children’s; (3) the microbial influences on immune system function, e.g. helping the immune system to respond to liver cancer; the role of Fusobacterium in stimulating colorectal tumors; or how an increment of Lactobacillus johnsonii in the gut explained the protection against allergies and asthma; and finally (4) the effect in lost weight and insulin control of Akkermansia muciniphila.

 

To read the full article “Our Microbes, Our Health”, please visit the link below.

 

(2013) Your Microbes, Your Health Science 342(6165) pp. 1440-1441

doi:10.1126/science.342.6165.1440-b

 

In addition, the editors suggested the following related resources:

 

Vujkovic-Cvijin R et al. (2013) Dysbiosis of the Gut Microbiota Is Associated with HIV Disease Progression and Tryptophan Catabolism Science Translational Medicine 5(193):1 93ra91. doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.3006438.

Rieder F. (2013) The Gut Microbiome in Intestinal Fibrosis: Environmental Protector or Provocateur? Science Translational Medicine 5(190): 190ps10.

doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.3004731

Prentice AM et al. (2013) Microbes and the Malnourished Child Science Translational Medicine 5(180):180fs11. doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.3006212.

Liou AP et al. (2013) Conserved Shifts in the Gut Microbiota Due to Gastric Bypass Reduce Host Weight and Adiposity Science Translational Medicine 5(178): 178ra41. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3005687.

 

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team