Tag Archives: vaginal seeding

In some countries like the United Kingdom and the United States, a practice among parents has become fashionable in recent months in which those who have just had a child via Caesarean section swab their newborn with the mother's vaginal fluids. This is known as 'vaginal seeding'. The aim of this practice is to try and restore the normal colonisation…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

In some countries like the United Kingdom and the United States, a practice among parents has become fashionable in recent months in which those who have just had a child via Caesarean section swab their newborn with the mother's vaginal fluids. This is known as 'vaginal seeding'. The aim of this practice is to try and restore the normal colonisation…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Mode of delivery is known to influence the microbiota composition of newborns. Vaginally-born infants develop a microbiota that resembles the mother's vaginal bacterial community, while those born by caesarean section (c-section) have a microbiota that more closely resembles adult skin. C-section delivery—increasingly prevalent in many countries—is associated with a greater risk of obesity, asthma, allergies, and immune disorders, but it's…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Mode of delivery is known to influence the microbiota composition of newborns. Vaginally-born infants develop a microbiota that resembles the mother's vaginal bacterial community, while those born by caesarean section (c-section) have a microbiota that more closely resembles adult skin. C-section delivery—increasingly prevalent in many countries—is associated with a greater risk of obesity, asthma, allergies, and immune disorders, but it's…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter