Tag Archives: stress

Obesity is currently at pandemic proportions and not only impairs metabolic homeostasis, but is also a risk factor for psychological disorders including depression. Although the underlying mechanisms of these associations are largely unknown, alterations in the communication between the gastrointestinal tract and the nervous system (also called the gut-brain axis) could play a key role. A new study, led by…

Yolanda Sanz
Yolanda Sanz holds a PhD in Pharmacy and is Professor of the National Research Council (CSIC) at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) in Valencia, Spain. She is principal investigator of the Research Unit on Microbial Ecology, Nutrition and Health at IATA-CSIC. Her scientific field of interest is the role of the human microbiota in health and diseases, which affect the immune and neuroendocrine systems. Currently, she coordinates one of the largest EU projects on the human microbiome that integrates 30 partners of the EU and of USA, CA, NZ and AU (MyNewGut; www.mynewgut.eu). Her scientific contributions are reflected in more than 150 articles published in international peer-reviewed journals, 170 participations in conferences and eight patents.

Obesity is currently at pandemic proportions and not only impairs metabolic homeostasis, but is also a risk factor for psychological disorders including depression. Although the underlying mechanisms of these associations are largely unknown, alterations in the communication between the gastrointestinal tract and the nervous system (also called the gut-brain axis) could play a key role. A new study, led by…

Yolanda Sanz
Yolanda Sanz holds a PhD in Pharmacy and is Professor of the National Research Council (CSIC) at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) in Valencia, Spain. She is principal investigator of the Research Unit on Microbial Ecology, Nutrition and Health at IATA-CSIC. Her scientific field of interest is the role of the human microbiota in health and diseases, which affect the immune and neuroendocrine systems. Currently, she coordinates one of the largest EU projects on the human microbiome that integrates 30 partners of the EU and of USA, CA, NZ and AU (MyNewGut; www.mynewgut.eu). Her scientific contributions are reflected in more than 150 articles published in international peer-reviewed journals, 170 participations in conferences and eight patents.

Our gut microbiota may be involved in mediating interactions between the enteric nervous system and central nervous system (CNS) through the gut-brain axis. The impact of commensal gut microbes on CNS functions have been studied mostly in mice. As such, the antibiotic-induced CNS consequences of manipulating humans' gut microbiota are still unknown. A new double-blinded randomized study led by our…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Our gut microbiota may be involved in mediating interactions between the enteric nervous system and central nervous system (CNS) through the gut-brain axis. The impact of commensal gut microbes on CNS functions have been studied mostly in mice. As such, the antibiotic-induced CNS consequences of manipulating humans' gut microbiota are still unknown. A new double-blinded randomized study led by our…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

If you are [a] zebra running for your life, or [a] lion sprinting for your next meal, you body's physiological response mechanisms are superbly adapted for dealing with such short-term physical emergencies... When we sit around and worry about stressful things, we turn on the same physiological responses—but they are potentially a disaster when provoked chronically. - Robert M. Sapolsky…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

If you are [a] zebra running for your life, or [a] lion sprinting for your next meal, you body's physiological response mechanisms are superbly adapted for dealing with such short-term physical emergencies... When we sit around and worry about stressful things, we turn on the same physiological responses—but they are potentially a disaster when provoked chronically. - Robert M. Sapolsky…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Alisa had to pack up and move while she was eight months pregnant—a stressful undertaking even without bearing an extra 25 pounds and an inability to tie her own shoes. But luckily, her best friend stepped in. As Alisa reports, “My bestie helped to pack up well over half my house as well as scrubbed the [entire] new home we…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Alisa had to pack up and move while she was eight months pregnant—a stressful undertaking even without bearing an extra 25 pounds and an inability to tie her own shoes. But luckily, her best friend stepped in. As Alisa reports, “My bestie helped to pack up well over half my house as well as scrubbed the [entire] new home we…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Previous research has shown that chemical and physical stress are major influencers of the physiology and ecology of the all microbes that have coevolved with a host. However, the physiologic effects of gut microbiome responses to physiologic stress have been poorly studied in humans. A recent study, led by Dr. Stefan Pasiakos from the Military Nutrition Division at the United…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous research has shown that chemical and physical stress are major influencers of the physiology and ecology of the all microbes that have coevolved with a host. However, the physiologic effects of gut microbiome responses to physiologic stress have been poorly studied in humans. A recent study, led by Dr. Stefan Pasiakos from the Military Nutrition Division at the United…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

"I want to make a difference in the world. Not drag myself from A to B until I die," wrote a sufferer of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)—a condition characterized by symptoms of pain and cramping, bloating, and cycles of diarrhea and/or constipation. It’s a statement of extreme hopelessness. And it comes from a person whose diagnosis is a digestive one.…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

"I want to make a difference in the world. Not drag myself from A to B until I die," wrote a sufferer of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)—a condition characterized by symptoms of pain and cramping, bloating, and cycles of diarrhea and/or constipation. It’s a statement of extreme hopelessness. And it comes from a person whose diagnosis is a digestive one.…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter