Tag Archives: Short-chain fatty acids

Although we already knew bacterial exposure of the baby’s digestive tract starts during pregnancy and during birth, but how the infant´s gut microbiota foundations are laid, how they change over time, and how the transition from infancy to childhood is organized is not yet fully understood. Now, a new paper published in Nature shed light on these questions. It provides…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Although we already knew bacterial exposure of the baby’s digestive tract starts during pregnancy and during birth, but how the infant´s gut microbiota foundations are laid, how they change over time, and how the transition from infancy to childhood is organized is not yet fully understood. Now, a new paper published in Nature shed light on these questions. It provides…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Other than gut microbiota's well-known functions, which include nutrient metabolism and absorption, xenobiotic and drug metabolism, and immune development, its role in protecting against pathogens has been poorly characterized. Previous research has identified some microbiota-mediated colonization resistance mechanisms, while little is known about whether microbial metabolites may also limit pathogen colonization. A new study, led by Dr. Denise Monack from…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Other than gut microbiota's well-known functions, which include nutrient metabolism and absorption, xenobiotic and drug metabolism, and immune development, its role in protecting against pathogens has been poorly characterized. Previous research has identified some microbiota-mediated colonization resistance mechanisms, while little is known about whether microbial metabolites may also limit pathogen colonization. A new study, led by Dr. Denise Monack from…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

During the past decade a large number of genomic studies have reported associations between our gut microbiota composition and metabolic disorders. However, a causal relationship between gut microbiota and metabolic diseases such as obesity or type 2 diabetes has yet to be confirmed. Furthermore, mechanisms by which gut microbes and their metabolites interact in the context of metabolic disorders have…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

During the past decade a large number of genomic studies have reported associations between our gut microbiota composition and metabolic disorders. However, a causal relationship between gut microbiota and metabolic diseases such as obesity or type 2 diabetes has yet to be confirmed. Furthermore, mechanisms by which gut microbes and their metabolites interact in the context of metabolic disorders have…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The effects of dietary fiber on a host's innate immune responses are thought to be mediated at local and systemic levels via short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Previous preclinical research has shown that mice that consume a diet high in fermentable fiber are protected against allergic airway inflammation through SCFAs. However, underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. A new study, led by…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The effects of dietary fiber on a host's innate immune responses are thought to be mediated at local and systemic levels via short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Previous preclinical research has shown that mice that consume a diet high in fermentable fiber are protected against allergic airway inflammation through SCFAs. However, underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. A new study, led by…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) represents a major healthcare concern that causes diarrhea and usually affects people who have recently been treated with antibiotics or have had an extended stay in a healthcare setting. It can also spread easily to others. Although previous experimental research has shown that a fiber-deprived diet leads to a disturbed host colonic epithelium and has an…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) represents a major healthcare concern that causes diarrhea and usually affects people who have recently been treated with antibiotics or have had an extended stay in a healthcare setting. It can also spread easily to others. Although previous experimental research has shown that a fiber-deprived diet leads to a disturbed host colonic epithelium and has an…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It has been suggested that the first 3 years of life are a critical period for dietary interventions aimed at gut microbiota modulation for improving child growth and development—the so-called “window of opportunity for microbial modulation”. Contrary to current belief, recent research has found that the gut microbiome of young children (study; study) and adolescents (study) is different from that…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It has been suggested that the first 3 years of life are a critical period for dietary interventions aimed at gut microbiota modulation for improving child growth and development—the so-called “window of opportunity for microbial modulation”. Contrary to current belief, recent research has found that the gut microbiome of young children (study; study) and adolescents (study) is different from that…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Regular and adequate levels of physical exercise help protect against several diseases and all-cause mortality. One of the mechanisms that has been gaining increasing attention in relation to how exercise impacts health outcomes is the favorable modification of the human gut microbiota. Although research in this field is still scarce, previous animal and human research findings showed that exercise can…

Stéphane Schneider
Professor Stéphane Schneider heads the Nutritional Support Unit in the Gastroenterology and Nutrition Department Archet University Hospital in Nice (France). He is also head of the Nice University Hospital’s food-nutrition liaison committee. Dr. Schneider is vice-president of the French-Speaking Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP), and chairs the Educational and Clinical Practice Committee of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Three years after receiving his M.D. in Gastroenterology from the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, he became an assistant Professor and later a full Professor of Nutrition. He is also certified by the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He obtained a Master of Science from the University of Paris VII, and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University Paul Cezanne, as well as a CME Diploma from Harvard Medical School. His main research interests are intestinal failure and the effects of aging and chronic diseases on nutritional status. He has published 188 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, with an h index of 37. His goal is to help understand better the role of the intestinal ecosystem, as well as the effects of different forms of bacteriotherapy, in digestive and non-digestive disorders featuring dysbiosis.

Regular and adequate levels of physical exercise help protect against several diseases and all-cause mortality. One of the mechanisms that has been gaining increasing attention in relation to how exercise impacts health outcomes is the favorable modification of the human gut microbiota. Although research in this field is still scarce, previous animal and human research findings showed that exercise can…

Stéphane Schneider
Professor Stéphane Schneider heads the Nutritional Support Unit in the Gastroenterology and Nutrition Department Archet University Hospital in Nice (France). He is also head of the Nice University Hospital’s food-nutrition liaison committee. Dr. Schneider is vice-president of the French-Speaking Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP), and chairs the Educational and Clinical Practice Committee of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Three years after receiving his M.D. in Gastroenterology from the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, he became an assistant Professor and later a full Professor of Nutrition. He is also certified by the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He obtained a Master of Science from the University of Paris VII, and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University Paul Cezanne, as well as a CME Diploma from Harvard Medical School. His main research interests are intestinal failure and the effects of aging and chronic diseases on nutritional status. He has published 188 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, with an h index of 37. His goal is to help understand better the role of the intestinal ecosystem, as well as the effects of different forms of bacteriotherapy, in digestive and non-digestive disorders featuring dysbiosis.

Gut bacterial communities ferment non-digestible carbohydrates and as a metabolic output produce short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that are involved in fiber’s beneficial effects. Activities of SCFAs include not only providing an energy substrate to colonocytes, but also mitigating inflammation, regulating weight through increasing satiety and balancing blood sugar, among others. Although deficiency in SCFA production has been related to chronic…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Gut bacterial communities ferment non-digestible carbohydrates and as a metabolic output produce short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that are involved in fiber’s beneficial effects. Activities of SCFAs include not only providing an energy substrate to colonocytes, but also mitigating inflammation, regulating weight through increasing satiety and balancing blood sugar, among others. Although deficiency in SCFA production has been related to chronic…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although both diet and medications together have been documented to be the main exogenous factor that modulates the gut microbiota composition and functional diversity, previous research in professional athletes has found that physical activity status correlates with gut microbiota composition. However, no intervention studies have yet been investigated the effects of endurance-based exercise training on the composition, functional capacity and…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although both diet and medications together have been documented to be the main exogenous factor that modulates the gut microbiota composition and functional diversity, previous research in professional athletes has found that physical activity status correlates with gut microbiota composition. However, no intervention studies have yet been investigated the effects of endurance-based exercise training on the composition, functional capacity and…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Probiotics have a range of documented effects on human health, with hundreds of studies from the past several decades showing their ability to alter physical or behavioural phenotypes in humans. These human efficacy trials provide the necessary evidence to guide probiotic use. In designing a trial, however, the researchers often wonder how to select the best strain for the task…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Probiotics have a range of documented effects on human health, with hundreds of studies from the past several decades showing their ability to alter physical or behavioural phenotypes in humans. These human efficacy trials provide the necessary evidence to guide probiotic use. In designing a trial, however, the researchers often wonder how to select the best strain for the task…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.