Tag Archives: Propionate

Fiber is good for health—that much we know. But for decades, scientists have been searching for the answer to a very simple question: how does dietary fiber manage to benefit the body? The answer turns out to be quite complicated. Currently, scientists think the gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the how fibre benefits health—and it's mostly thanks to…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Fiber is good for health—that much we know. But for decades, scientists have been searching for the answer to a very simple question: how does dietary fiber manage to benefit the body? The answer turns out to be quite complicated. Currently, scientists think the gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the how fibre benefits health—and it's mostly thanks to…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

It has been previously hypothesized that gut microbes could control a host’s eating behaviour through several potential mechanisms, including microbial manipulation of reward pathways, production of toxins that alter mood, changes to receptors (including taste receptors), and interference with neurotransmission via the vagus nerve—the main neural axis between the gut and the brain. In this context, it has also been…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It has been previously hypothesized that gut microbes could control a host’s eating behaviour through several potential mechanisms, including microbial manipulation of reward pathways, production of toxins that alter mood, changes to receptors (including taste receptors), and interference with neurotransmission via the vagus nerve—the main neural axis between the gut and the brain. In this context, it has also been…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados