Tag Archives: Prevotella

‘You are what you eat’ is something we have heard for years, and not only at the doctor’s office. Nevertheless, science is now backing this up – for example, just recently Dr. Gary Wu, of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, completed a study that supports this idea. Leading a team of researchers, Wu observed that…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

‘You are what you eat’ is something we have heard for years, and not only at the doctor’s office. Nevertheless, science is now backing this up – for example, just recently Dr. Gary Wu, of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, completed a study that supports this idea. Leading a team of researchers, Wu observed that…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

The predominant genera in the human colonic microbiota are Bacteroides and Prevotella, which belong to the major phyla Bacteroidetes. Their composition and metabolic activities are largely modulated by diet and, in addition, they can also affect the metabolism of food. Prevotella is associated with plant-rich diets (high levels of complex carbohydrates and fruit and vegetable intake), whereas Bacteroides is linked…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The predominant genera in the human colonic microbiota are Bacteroides and Prevotella, which belong to the major phyla Bacteroidetes. Their composition and metabolic activities are largely modulated by diet and, in addition, they can also affect the metabolism of food. Prevotella is associated with plant-rich diets (high levels of complex carbohydrates and fruit and vegetable intake), whereas Bacteroides is linked…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Why diets do not have the same effect in different individuals has long been a mystery in the field of nutrition. Different studies in recent years have shed some light on the issue, highlighting the role gut microbiota plays in both the physiology and metabolism of humans. In fact, it is known that the trillion microorganisms inhabiting the human colon…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Why diets do not have the same effect in different individuals has long been a mystery in the field of nutrition. Different studies in recent years have shed some light on the issue, highlighting the role gut microbiota plays in both the physiology and metabolism of humans. In fact, it is known that the trillion microorganisms inhabiting the human colon…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina