Tag Archives: Metagenomics

Obtaining a close characterization of human microbial diversity and abundance remains a challenge for the researchers of today. In the past, microbial composition was studied using culture-based methods that underestimated diversity, as only between 20% and 50% members are culturable. Over the past decade, our understanding of the composition and diversity of the gut microbiota has advanced through culture-independent methods…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Obtaining a close characterization of human microbial diversity and abundance remains a challenge for the researchers of today. In the past, microbial composition was studied using culture-based methods that underestimated diversity, as only between 20% and 50% members are culturable. Over the past decade, our understanding of the composition and diversity of the gut microbiota has advanced through culture-independent methods…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

After the Human Genome Project success, at the beginning of 21st century, the scientific community agreed the human microbiome was a major challenge in medical research. As many of the bacteria integrating it could not be cultivated in a petri dish in a lab, little was known about this huge community of microorganisms inhabiting our body. It began to be…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

After the Human Genome Project success, at the beginning of 21st century, the scientific community agreed the human microbiome was a major challenge in medical research. As many of the bacteria integrating it could not be cultivated in a petri dish in a lab, little was known about this huge community of microorganisms inhabiting our body. It began to be…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut microbial communities display inter-individual variation and current research focuses on studying the gastrointestinal microbiome at both compositional and functional levels. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a disease conditioned by an interplay of both genetics and environment. Links between gut microbiota and T1DM are still uncertain. A recent study, led by Dr. Paul Wilmes from the Luxembourg Centre for…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Gut microbial communities display inter-individual variation and current research focuses on studying the gastrointestinal microbiome at both compositional and functional levels. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a disease conditioned by an interplay of both genetics and environment. Links between gut microbiota and T1DM are still uncertain. A recent study, led by Dr. Paul Wilmes from the Luxembourg Centre for…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.