Tag Archives: Gut microbiome

Life-threatening food allergies are constantly increasing in Westernized countries and alterations in the gut microbiome, especially in early life, could contribute to the rise in their prevalence. Although both a reduced bacterial diversity and an increased Enterobacteriaceae/Bacteroidaceae ratio in infancy have been associated with food sensitization, as well as increased levels of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) in germ-free and antibiotics-treated…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Life-threatening food allergies are constantly increasing in Westernized countries and alterations in the gut microbiome, especially in early life, could contribute to the rise in their prevalence. Although both a reduced bacterial diversity and an increased Enterobacteriaceae/Bacteroidaceae ratio in infancy have been associated with food sensitization, as well as increased levels of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) in germ-free and antibiotics-treated…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Maternal physiology and metabolism during pregnancy adjust so the fetus may grow healthy. As part of these changes, the gut microbiota evolves towards a pro-inflammatory profile, which contributes to a healthy pregnancy. Even so, the extent to which gut microbiota alterations induced by pregnancy and lactation may change autoimmune mechanisms that are involved in disease has not yet been explored.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Maternal physiology and metabolism during pregnancy adjust so the fetus may grow healthy. As part of these changes, the gut microbiota evolves towards a pro-inflammatory profile, which contributes to a healthy pregnancy. Even so, the extent to which gut microbiota alterations induced by pregnancy and lactation may change autoimmune mechanisms that are involved in disease has not yet been explored.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The functional metagenomic screening of the human gut microbiome gives us a better understanding of how microbial genes shape almost all aspects of physiology. Although an important number of microbial species have yet to be characterized, next generation approaches have increased the number of gut microorganism genomes that can be mapped. For instance, analysis of the gut metagenome has provided…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The functional metagenomic screening of the human gut microbiome gives us a better understanding of how microbial genes shape almost all aspects of physiology. Although an important number of microbial species have yet to be characterized, next generation approaches have increased the number of gut microorganism genomes that can be mapped. For instance, analysis of the gut metagenome has provided…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The gut microbiota has become a new player in the onset and development of metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies. One gut bacterium that has been positively associated with leanness in mice and humans is Akkermansia muciniphila, which is naturally present in the gut microbiota of healthy people. In 2017, our research team at UCLouvain (Belgium) found that a pasteurized…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

The gut microbiota has become a new player in the onset and development of metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies. One gut bacterium that has been positively associated with leanness in mice and humans is Akkermansia muciniphila, which is naturally present in the gut microbiota of healthy people. In 2017, our research team at UCLouvain (Belgium) found that a pasteurized…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Different environmental factors may shape human gut microbiome variation. Although diet has a major influence on gut microbiome shifts within an individual, at population level, diet contributes little to gut microbiome variation. Although our gut microbiome might contribute to interindividual variability in response to diet, close monitoring of how temporal variation in diet alters gut microbiome composition and stability at…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Different environmental factors may shape human gut microbiome variation. Although diet has a major influence on gut microbiome shifts within an individual, at population level, diet contributes little to gut microbiome variation. Although our gut microbiome might contribute to interindividual variability in response to diet, close monitoring of how temporal variation in diet alters gut microbiome composition and stability at…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The modification of the human gut microbiota’s composition and function is one of the plausible mechanisms that has just recently started being explored in relation to how exercise affects health. Although gut microbiome composition tends to show higher variability under environmental pressures, its diversity functionality tends to remain consistent within and across subjects. In professional athletes, however, little is known…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The modification of the human gut microbiota’s composition and function is one of the plausible mechanisms that has just recently started being explored in relation to how exercise affects health. Although gut microbiome composition tends to show higher variability under environmental pressures, its diversity functionality tends to remain consistent within and across subjects. In professional athletes, however, little is known…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The microorganisms that live in our guts are more important than many of us think. However, one of the biggest threats to the health and diversity of our gut microbiota is the inappropriate use of antibiotics. To raise awareness on this issue and empower people to use antibiotics responsibility, the World Microbiome Day 2019 theme is ‘Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics.’…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

The microorganisms that live in our guts are more important than many of us think. However, one of the biggest threats to the health and diversity of our gut microbiota is the inappropriate use of antibiotics. To raise awareness on this issue and empower people to use antibiotics responsibility, the World Microbiome Day 2019 theme is ‘Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics.’…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

Mental health-related conditions such as anxiety and depression have been found to be more frequent in adults with functional gastrointestinal disorders that include irritable bowel syndrome. Although these findings suggest a close relationship between mental illness and functional gastrointestinal symptoms, little is known about the extent to which these manifestations may share a common etiology, especially in early life, when…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Mental health-related conditions such as anxiety and depression have been found to be more frequent in adults with functional gastrointestinal disorders that include irritable bowel syndrome. Although these findings suggest a close relationship between mental illness and functional gastrointestinal symptoms, little is known about the extent to which these manifestations may share a common etiology, especially in early life, when…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Although twin research has shown that gut microbiota features a heritable component, we do not know whether gut microbial genetic variations can shape phenotypic differences that affect host health. A new study, led by Dr. Eran Segal from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot (Israel), has identified structural variations in gut microbial genomes that vary across people and are…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Although twin research has shown that gut microbiota features a heritable component, we do not know whether gut microbial genetic variations can shape phenotypic differences that affect host health. A new study, led by Dr. Eran Segal from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot (Israel), has identified structural variations in gut microbial genomes that vary across people and are…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team