Tag Archives: Gut-brain axis

Experimental research has previously shown how the gut microbiota is involved in regulating brain function through the gut-brain axis. Depression and anxiety are among the most prevalent mental health conditions in industrialized countries and there is a current need for novel psychopharmacological medications to be developed for both conditions. Although the gut microbiota has been hypothesized to be involved in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Experimental research has previously shown how the gut microbiota is involved in regulating brain function through the gut-brain axis. Depression and anxiety are among the most prevalent mental health conditions in industrialized countries and there is a current need for novel psychopharmacological medications to be developed for both conditions. Although the gut microbiota has been hypothesized to be involved in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

From Crohn’s disease to asthma, obesity or even type 2 diabetes, gut microbiota dysbiosis has already been linked to a wide range of human diseases. Even to mental health and behavior. Previous research studies have already shown there is a connection between our gut and our brain. But as they have been done using animal models, could these results found…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

From Crohn’s disease to asthma, obesity or even type 2 diabetes, gut microbiota dysbiosis has already been linked to a wide range of human diseases. Even to mental health and behavior. Previous research studies have already shown there is a connection between our gut and our brain. But as they have been done using animal models, could these results found…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Modulating the gut microbiota has emerged as a means of affecting the central nervous system function and, thus, human behavior, especially in the context of stress, mood and anxiety disorders and even neurocognitive disorders. Clinical studies with probiotics using neuroimaging methods have started exploring the benefits of probiotics in the human brain. Among them, the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum 1714 has…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Modulating the gut microbiota has emerged as a means of affecting the central nervous system function and, thus, human behavior, especially in the context of stress, mood and anxiety disorders and even neurocognitive disorders. Clinical studies with probiotics using neuroimaging methods have started exploring the benefits of probiotics in the human brain. Among them, the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum 1714 has…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Microbiome studies carried out in the past decade have led to an enhanced understanding of the gut microbiome in human health. However, most of these studies have been carried out in western countries and the Indian gut microbiome is not well explored. Since dietary habits and lifestyle play a key role in shaping the gut microbiome, large differences in the…

Vineet K. Sharma
Dr. Sharma has been an Associate Professor at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal since July 2011. Dr. Sharma obtained his PhD in Bioinformatics and Biomedical Sciences from IGIB, New Delhi in 2006. After completing his doctoral research, he worked as a scientist at RIKEN, Japan for five years and joined IISER Bhopal after returning to India. He is also the founder and coordinator of the Innovation and Incubation Centre of Entrepreneurship (IICE) at IISER Bhopal. The main focus of Dr. Sharma’s lab is to reveal and analyze the human-associated microbiome among the Indian population and carry out comparative studies with different populations to gain functional insights, while also making comparisons with healthy and disease datasets. Dr. Sharma’s groups also recently sequenced the genome of the peacock, which is the national bird of India.

Microbiome studies carried out in the past decade have led to an enhanced understanding of the gut microbiome in human health. However, most of these studies have been carried out in western countries and the Indian gut microbiome is not well explored. Since dietary habits and lifestyle play a key role in shaping the gut microbiome, large differences in the…

Vineet K. Sharma
Dr. Sharma has been an Associate Professor at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal since July 2011. Dr. Sharma obtained his PhD in Bioinformatics and Biomedical Sciences from IGIB, New Delhi in 2006. After completing his doctoral research, he worked as a scientist at RIKEN, Japan for five years and joined IISER Bhopal after returning to India. He is also the founder and coordinator of the Innovation and Incubation Centre of Entrepreneurship (IICE) at IISER Bhopal. The main focus of Dr. Sharma’s lab is to reveal and analyze the human-associated microbiome among the Indian population and carry out comparative studies with different populations to gain functional insights, while also making comparisons with healthy and disease datasets. Dr. Sharma’s groups also recently sequenced the genome of the peacock, which is the national bird of India.

Obesity may develop from a combination of different factors – some environmental factors, genetic predisposition and according to recent research microbiome may also play certain role in it. Obesity often co-occurs with mental health disorders, including a higher risk of developing depression and anxiety which is also true for other chronic illnesses. But although we know that neurological symptoms may…

Karina Kaplun
Karina Kaplun is a Ph.D. microbiologist and a blogger specialising in gut microbiota and probiotics. Working also as a lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Karina on Twitter and Facebook @mygutmatters and visit her blog www.mygutmatters.com

Obesity may develop from a combination of different factors – some environmental factors, genetic predisposition and according to recent research microbiome may also play certain role in it. Obesity often co-occurs with mental health disorders, including a higher risk of developing depression and anxiety which is also true for other chronic illnesses. But although we know that neurological symptoms may…

Karina Kaplun
Karina Kaplun is a Ph.D. microbiologist and a blogger specialising in gut microbiota and probiotics. Working also as a lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Karina on Twitter and Facebook @mygutmatters and visit her blog www.mygutmatters.com

Although gut microbiota maturation is a dynamic process apparent across a lifetime, the first two to three years of life may represent the most critical period for dietary interventions that target the microbiota and its contribution to improving child growth and brain development. One area of current microbiome research studies the close relationship between the development of the gut and…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Although gut microbiota maturation is a dynamic process apparent across a lifetime, the first two to three years of life may represent the most critical period for dietary interventions that target the microbiota and its contribution to improving child growth and brain development. One area of current microbiome research studies the close relationship between the development of the gut and…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

With 2019 just around the corner, we have taken a moment to look back over the year gone by and consider how much great progress was made in gut microbiota research in 2018. With more than 50 articles published on our platform over the past 12 months discussing these achievements and outcomes, it now gives the GMFH publishing team great…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

With 2019 just around the corner, we have taken a moment to look back over the year gone by and consider how much great progress was made in gut microbiota research in 2018. With more than 50 articles published on our platform over the past 12 months discussing these achievements and outcomes, it now gives the GMFH publishing team great…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It has long been known that the gut communicates with the brain via different pathways that include neuronal activation, the release of hormones and immune signals. Enteroendocrine cells (EECs)—scattered along the gastrointestinal tract between absorptive enterocytes—are involved in sensing luminal nutrients and bacteria and communicating this indirectly to the brain via the release of gut hormones (e.g. cholecystokinin). However, the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It has long been known that the gut communicates with the brain via different pathways that include neuronal activation, the release of hormones and immune signals. Enteroendocrine cells (EECs)—scattered along the gastrointestinal tract between absorptive enterocytes—are involved in sensing luminal nutrients and bacteria and communicating this indirectly to the brain via the release of gut hormones (e.g. cholecystokinin). However, the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Understanding the interaction between brain, gut and microbiome is the goal of John Cryan's work as Principal Investigator at the APC Microbiome Institute in Cork, Ireland. In the talk he gave at TEDxHa'pennyBridge, held in Dublin in June 2017, Prof. Cryan looked into this connection and its influence over psychiatric and immune-related disorders. 

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Understanding the interaction between brain, gut and microbiome is the goal of John Cryan's work as Principal Investigator at the APC Microbiome Institute in Cork, Ireland. In the talk he gave at TEDxHa'pennyBridge, held in Dublin in June 2017, Prof. Cryan looked into this connection and its influence over psychiatric and immune-related disorders. 

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team