Tag Archives: Gut-brain axis

For many years, scientists have studied the link between gut microbiota and diseases such as dementia, autism, Parkinson’s, diabetes, obesity or colitis, proving that each disease has a specific gut microbiota profile. Studies have also focused on the gut-brain axis, in which bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) translocate to the brain through circulating blood, while gut microbiota also generates metabolites that affect…

Manon Oliero
Manon Oliero is starting her PhD about gut microbiota, nutrition and cancer at the CRCHUM of Montreal. Before, she specialized in the gut microbiota and nutrition field by obtaining a master’s degree in Paris in microbiology and a food and health engineer degree in Beauvais. She first meets the scientific communication world in Barcelona after her work on gut microbiota and diet at the VHIR. She is really concern about health of the population and believe that with a better diet and lifestyle we can all make ourselves healthier.

For many years, scientists have studied the link between gut microbiota and diseases such as dementia, autism, Parkinson’s, diabetes, obesity or colitis, proving that each disease has a specific gut microbiota profile. Studies have also focused on the gut-brain axis, in which bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) translocate to the brain through circulating blood, while gut microbiota also generates metabolites that affect…

Manon Oliero
Manon Oliero is starting her PhD about gut microbiota, nutrition and cancer at the CRCHUM of Montreal. Before, she specialized in the gut microbiota and nutrition field by obtaining a master’s degree in Paris in microbiology and a food and health engineer degree in Beauvais. She first meets the scientific communication world in Barcelona after her work on gut microbiota and diet at the VHIR. She is really concern about health of the population and believe that with a better diet and lifestyle we can all make ourselves healthier.

The human microbiome has not only captured the attention of scientists, but also healthcare practitioners and the lay press. While initial studies focused on characterizing the gut microbiome in the context of both health and disease and the influence of environmental factors, there has been a shift in the field towards mechanistic research focusing on microbiome influence on host phenotype,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The human microbiome has not only captured the attention of scientists, but also healthcare practitioners and the lay press. While initial studies focused on characterizing the gut microbiome in the context of both health and disease and the influence of environmental factors, there has been a shift in the field towards mechanistic research focusing on microbiome influence on host phenotype,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Poor sleep quality is a widespread problem and has been associated with several diseases in humans such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Previous research has reported that the human gut microbiota may express endogenous circadian rhythms, together with findings showing alterations of the gut microbiota in response to sleep deprivation. On the other hand, the gut microbiota and its metabolites…

Allison Clark
Allison Clark has a master in nutrition and health from Open University in Barcelona and a master in journalism. She is a freelance writer and nutritionist and has written various peer review papers about the role the gut microbiota plays in health, disease and endurance exercise performance. Allison is passionate about the role diet and the gut microbiota play in health and disease. Follow her on Twitter @Heal_your_Gut

Poor sleep quality is a widespread problem and has been associated with several diseases in humans such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Previous research has reported that the human gut microbiota may express endogenous circadian rhythms, together with findings showing alterations of the gut microbiota in response to sleep deprivation. On the other hand, the gut microbiota and its metabolites…

Allison Clark
Allison Clark has a master in nutrition and health from Open University in Barcelona and a master in journalism. She is a freelance writer and nutritionist and has written various peer review papers about the role the gut microbiota plays in health, disease and endurance exercise performance. Allison is passionate about the role diet and the gut microbiota play in health and disease. Follow her on Twitter @Heal_your_Gut

The community of microorganisms residing in our gut have been shown to affect brain function and behavior. However, scientists still struggle to explain how gut-brain communication occurs. Chu and colleagues have unraveled mechanisms by which gut microbiota affects mice adaptation to fear conditioning. By using a classic Pavlovian test, the authors first trained mice to associate a tone with pain…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The community of microorganisms residing in our gut have been shown to affect brain function and behavior. However, scientists still struggle to explain how gut-brain communication occurs. Chu and colleagues have unraveled mechanisms by which gut microbiota affects mice adaptation to fear conditioning. By using a classic Pavlovian test, the authors first trained mice to associate a tone with pain…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It was one of those family meals you have once a year. Grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, brothers and sisters-in-law, siblings, all together gathered around a splendid table, chatting, eating the delicacies cooked by grandma, when all of a sudden, a familiar but surprising sound followed by that... smell made everyone silenced. Pooh! Then, ‘It’s just a little fart!’ said my…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

It was one of those family meals you have once a year. Grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, brothers and sisters-in-law, siblings, all together gathered around a splendid table, chatting, eating the delicacies cooked by grandma, when all of a sudden, a familiar but surprising sound followed by that... smell made everyone silenced. Pooh! Then, ‘It’s just a little fart!’ said my…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Experimental research has previously shown how the gut microbiota is involved in regulating brain function through the gut-brain axis. Depression and anxiety are among the most prevalent mental health conditions in industrialized countries and there is a current need for novel psychopharmacological medications to be developed for both conditions. Although the gut microbiota has been hypothesized to be involved in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Experimental research has previously shown how the gut microbiota is involved in regulating brain function through the gut-brain axis. Depression and anxiety are among the most prevalent mental health conditions in industrialized countries and there is a current need for novel psychopharmacological medications to be developed for both conditions. Although the gut microbiota has been hypothesized to be involved in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

From Crohn’s disease to asthma, obesity or even type 2 diabetes, gut microbiota dysbiosis has already been linked to a wide range of human diseases. Even to mental health and behavior. Previous research studies have already shown there is a connection between our gut and our brain. But as they have been done using animal models, could these results found…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

From Crohn’s disease to asthma, obesity or even type 2 diabetes, gut microbiota dysbiosis has already been linked to a wide range of human diseases. Even to mental health and behavior. Previous research studies have already shown there is a connection between our gut and our brain. But as they have been done using animal models, could these results found…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Modulating the gut microbiota has emerged as a means of affecting the central nervous system function and, thus, human behavior, especially in the context of stress, mood and anxiety disorders and even neurocognitive disorders. Clinical studies with probiotics using neuroimaging methods have started exploring the benefits of probiotics in the human brain. Among them, the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum 1714 has…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Modulating the gut microbiota has emerged as a means of affecting the central nervous system function and, thus, human behavior, especially in the context of stress, mood and anxiety disorders and even neurocognitive disorders. Clinical studies with probiotics using neuroimaging methods have started exploring the benefits of probiotics in the human brain. Among them, the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum 1714 has…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Microbiome studies carried out in the past decade have led to an enhanced understanding of the gut microbiome in human health. However, most of these studies have been carried out in western countries and the Indian gut microbiome is not well explored. Since dietary habits and lifestyle play a key role in shaping the gut microbiome, large differences in the…

Vineet K. Sharma
Dr. Sharma has been an Associate Professor at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal since July 2011. Dr. Sharma obtained his PhD in Bioinformatics and Biomedical Sciences from IGIB, New Delhi in 2006. After completing his doctoral research, he worked as a scientist at RIKEN, Japan for five years and joined IISER Bhopal after returning to India. He is also the founder and coordinator of the Innovation and Incubation Centre of Entrepreneurship (IICE) at IISER Bhopal. The main focus of Dr. Sharma’s lab is to reveal and analyze the human-associated microbiome among the Indian population and carry out comparative studies with different populations to gain functional insights, while also making comparisons with healthy and disease datasets. Dr. Sharma’s groups also recently sequenced the genome of the peacock, which is the national bird of India.

Microbiome studies carried out in the past decade have led to an enhanced understanding of the gut microbiome in human health. However, most of these studies have been carried out in western countries and the Indian gut microbiome is not well explored. Since dietary habits and lifestyle play a key role in shaping the gut microbiome, large differences in the…

Vineet K. Sharma
Dr. Sharma has been an Associate Professor at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal since July 2011. Dr. Sharma obtained his PhD in Bioinformatics and Biomedical Sciences from IGIB, New Delhi in 2006. After completing his doctoral research, he worked as a scientist at RIKEN, Japan for five years and joined IISER Bhopal after returning to India. He is also the founder and coordinator of the Innovation and Incubation Centre of Entrepreneurship (IICE) at IISER Bhopal. The main focus of Dr. Sharma’s lab is to reveal and analyze the human-associated microbiome among the Indian population and carry out comparative studies with different populations to gain functional insights, while also making comparisons with healthy and disease datasets. Dr. Sharma’s groups also recently sequenced the genome of the peacock, which is the national bird of India.