Tag Archives: gut barrier

The intestinal epithelial barrier is not just a static physical barrier but rather interacts continuously with the gut microbiome and immune cells. An intact intestinal barrier protects the host against invasion of microorganisms and toxins whereas at the same time it allows absorption of essential fluids and nutrients. The pathophysiology of cirrhosis is associated with a dysfunctional intestinal barrier, which…

Oriol Juanola & Rubén Francés
Oriol Juanola is a PhD. student of the Hepatic and Intestinal Immunobiology Group at Miguel Hernández University (Alicante, Spain). The group is interested in molecular and cellular aspects around the immune system that are responsible for the surveillance, response and regulation of homeostasis with our gut microbiota in the so-called "gut-liver axis", a central element in different metabolic pathologies within the scope of the gastroenterology and hepatology. The translation of these aspects, addressed from different methodological perspectives, to the clinical field is also relevant for the Group in order to improve the diagnosis, treatment and/or prognosis of these diseases. Rubén Francés is professor of Immunology and Head of the Hepatic and Intestinal Immunobiology Group at Miguel Hernández University and the Biomedical Research Networking Center in Hepatic and Digestive Diseases (CIBEREHD).

The intestinal epithelial barrier is not just a static physical barrier but rather interacts continuously with the gut microbiome and immune cells. An intact intestinal barrier protects the host against invasion of microorganisms and toxins whereas at the same time it allows absorption of essential fluids and nutrients. The pathophysiology of cirrhosis is associated with a dysfunctional intestinal barrier, which…

Oriol Juanola & Rubén Francés
Oriol Juanola is a PhD. student of the Hepatic and Intestinal Immunobiology Group at Miguel Hernández University (Alicante, Spain). The group is interested in molecular and cellular aspects around the immune system that are responsible for the surveillance, response and regulation of homeostasis with our gut microbiota in the so-called "gut-liver axis", a central element in different metabolic pathologies within the scope of the gastroenterology and hepatology. The translation of these aspects, addressed from different methodological perspectives, to the clinical field is also relevant for the Group in order to improve the diagnosis, treatment and/or prognosis of these diseases. Rubén Francés is professor of Immunology and Head of the Hepatic and Intestinal Immunobiology Group at Miguel Hernández University and the Biomedical Research Networking Center in Hepatic and Digestive Diseases (CIBEREHD).

Western diets high in fats and sugars, modern lifestyles with stress and sedentarism and the indiscriminate use of antibiotics together with other frequently prescribed drugs -such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors- are major drivers of changes in microbiota composition and gut barrier disruption. (Dr. Maria Rescigno) The GMFH publishing team is pleased to share a new summary…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Western diets high in fats and sugars, modern lifestyles with stress and sedentarism and the indiscriminate use of antibiotics together with other frequently prescribed drugs -such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors- are major drivers of changes in microbiota composition and gut barrier disruption. (Dr. Maria Rescigno) The GMFH publishing team is pleased to share a new summary…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The gut microbiota has wide-ranging effects on host physiology and is an important determinant of health and disease. As we have learned over the past two decades, these effects are not limited to the gastrointestinal tract, but can influence host functions throughout the body.  A great deal of research has focused on understanding the mechanisms by which microbes influence host…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

The gut microbiota has wide-ranging effects on host physiology and is an important determinant of health and disease. As we have learned over the past two decades, these effects are not limited to the gastrointestinal tract, but can influence host functions throughout the body.  A great deal of research has focused on understanding the mechanisms by which microbes influence host…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Mutations that lead to an impairment of tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2 (Tet2) function or/and expression -  a gene that encodes an epigenetic modifier enzyme - have been related to the development of haematopoietic malignancies in both mice and humans. According to a new study in Nature by Marlies Meisel and Reinhard Hinterleitner from the University of Chicago and collaborators, gut…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Mutations that lead to an impairment of tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2 (Tet2) function or/and expression -  a gene that encodes an epigenetic modifier enzyme - have been related to the development of haematopoietic malignancies in both mice and humans. According to a new study in Nature by Marlies Meisel and Reinhard Hinterleitner from the University of Chicago and collaborators, gut…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

The prevalence of obesity and related metabolic conditions is increasing worldwide and has become a major public health issue. Recent research has highlighted the gut microbiome's contribution to the development of non-communicable diseases, although little is known about underlying mechanisms and causal relationships. A new study led by Prof. Harry Sokol, a gastroenterologist and researcher from the French National Institute…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The prevalence of obesity and related metabolic conditions is increasing worldwide and has become a major public health issue. Recent research has highlighted the gut microbiome's contribution to the development of non-communicable diseases, although little is known about underlying mechanisms and causal relationships. A new study led by Prof. Harry Sokol, a gastroenterologist and researcher from the French National Institute…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Mice models are widely used to assess the impact of exposure to environmental factors such as chemicals, drugs or infectious agents on host homeostasis through modulation of the gut microbiota. A new study, led by Dr. Guodong Zhang from the University of Massachusetts (USA), has found that exposure to triclosan increases colonic inflammation and colitis-associated colon tumorigenesis in mice. Triclosan…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Mice models are widely used to assess the impact of exposure to environmental factors such as chemicals, drugs or infectious agents on host homeostasis through modulation of the gut microbiota. A new study, led by Dr. Guodong Zhang from the University of Massachusetts (USA), has found that exposure to triclosan increases colonic inflammation and colitis-associated colon tumorigenesis in mice. Triclosan…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

What happens if we don’t feed our gut microbiota? According to Mahesh Desai, researcher at the Luxembourg Institute of Health, the gut barrier might be destroyed or eroded and that could potentially lead to intestinal diseases. “We have a gut microbiota that is evolved to feed on the fibers that we eat, but it has also evolved to feed on…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

What happens if we don’t feed our gut microbiota? According to Mahesh Desai, researcher at the Luxembourg Institute of Health, the gut barrier might be destroyed or eroded and that could potentially lead to intestinal diseases. “We have a gut microbiota that is evolved to feed on the fibers that we eat, but it has also evolved to feed on…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Previous research has shown that gut microbiota dysbiosis may be involved in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), which is a chronic inflammatory disease that mainly affects the sacroiliac joints and spine. However, the implications it could have for both local and systemic immune responses in AS has not yet been explored. A recent study, led by Dr. Giovanni Triolo…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that gut microbiota dysbiosis may be involved in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), which is a chronic inflammatory disease that mainly affects the sacroiliac joints and spine. However, the implications it could have for both local and systemic immune responses in AS has not yet been explored. A recent study, led by Dr. Giovanni Triolo…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Fast food, gut microbes, sweet drinks, desk jobs: over the years, obesity has been blamed on many things. A Time-Life book on food and nutrition from 1967 implicated—among other things—cars. "The automobile has almost eliminated walking," write the authors. "This decrease in exercise, which reduces the requirement for calories, has not always been accompanied by a corresponding decrease in appetite."…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Fast food, gut microbes, sweet drinks, desk jobs: over the years, obesity has been blamed on many things. A Time-Life book on food and nutrition from 1967 implicated—among other things—cars. "The automobile has almost eliminated walking," write the authors. "This decrease in exercise, which reduces the requirement for calories, has not always been accompanied by a corresponding decrease in appetite."…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter