Tag Archives: food intolerance

Can you tell the difference between food sensitivity and food intolerance? Both are garnering increasing media attention that can sometimes cause confusion, with inaccurate information possibly leading to self-diagnosis and unnecessary dietary restrictions. To shed some light on the topic, we have created an infographic highlighting the differences between the two conditions. Have a look at our new Gut Microbiota…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Can you tell the difference between food sensitivity and food intolerance? Both are garnering increasing media attention that can sometimes cause confusion, with inaccurate information possibly leading to self-diagnosis and unnecessary dietary restrictions. To shed some light on the topic, we have created an infographic highlighting the differences between the two conditions. Have a look at our new Gut Microbiota…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The ability to distinguish between “self” and “non-self” is the hallmark of a healthy immune system. Immune cells must be able to recognize pathogenic “non-self” antigens (i.e. microbial pathogens) and mount an appropriate immune response while remaining quiescent towards “self” agents (i.e. commensal microbes) that are harmless to our health. Nowhere else in the human body is this process more…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

The ability to distinguish between “self” and “non-self” is the hallmark of a healthy immune system. Immune cells must be able to recognize pathogenic “non-self” antigens (i.e. microbial pathogens) and mount an appropriate immune response while remaining quiescent towards “self” agents (i.e. commensal microbes) that are harmless to our health. Nowhere else in the human body is this process more…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.