Tag Archives: disease

Eran Segal Computer Science Department, Weizmann Institute of Science Abstract: Accumulating evidence supports a causal role for the human gut microbiome in obesity, diabetes, metabolic disorders, cardiovascular disease, and numerous other conditions. I will present our research on the role of the human microbiome in health and disease, aimed at developing personalized medicine approaches that combine human genetics, microbiome, and nutrition. In one project, we tackled the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Eran Segal Computer Science Department, Weizmann Institute of Science Abstract: Accumulating evidence supports a causal role for the human gut microbiome in obesity, diabetes, metabolic disorders, cardiovascular disease, and numerous other conditions. I will present our research on the role of the human microbiome in health and disease, aimed at developing personalized medicine approaches that combine human genetics, microbiome, and nutrition. In one project, we tackled the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In microbiome research, many mechanistic insights are enabled through the use of animal models. A new paper co-led by Andy Wullaert in Belgium and Kathy McCoy in Switzerland addresses a major question about the use of animal models and the conclusions drawn from experiments that are not rigorously designed. Although it is well known that gut microbiota is important in…

Hervé Blottière
Research Director at INRA, the French National Research Institute for Agricultural and Food Research, Hervé Blottière presently heads a research laboratory studying the Human Intestinal Ecosystem within the MICALIS institute “Food and Gut Microbiology for Human Health”. He is Scientific Director of the MetaGenoPolis initiative, a platform of excellence dedicated to quantitative and functional metagenomics, funded by the French government Futures Investments, where he has set up a robotic platform to allow high throughput screenings. He is also involved in ANR, the French National Research Agency, and the EU funded projects on Human Gut Microbiota and Health: MetaHIT, Cross-Talk and MetaCardis. Hervé Blottière obtained a PhD in Tumor Immunology from the University of Nantes (France) in 1989, and spent two years at the Wistar Institute (Philadelphia, U.S.A.). His main research interest is the Functional Metagenomics approach to study host-microbiota cross-talk. He has published >135 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. His goal is to provide a better understanding of the symbiosis between gut microbiota and its host and to decipher the mechanisms of interaction between intestinal bacteria and human mucosal cells at the molecular level. Finding these molecular mediators will provide target for manipulation or therapeutics tools to restore symbiosis in chronic diseases.

In microbiome research, many mechanistic insights are enabled through the use of animal models. A new paper co-led by Andy Wullaert in Belgium and Kathy McCoy in Switzerland addresses a major question about the use of animal models and the conclusions drawn from experiments that are not rigorously designed. Although it is well known that gut microbiota is important in…

Hervé Blottière
Research Director at INRA, the French National Research Institute for Agricultural and Food Research, Hervé Blottière presently heads a research laboratory studying the Human Intestinal Ecosystem within the MICALIS institute “Food and Gut Microbiology for Human Health”. He is Scientific Director of the MetaGenoPolis initiative, a platform of excellence dedicated to quantitative and functional metagenomics, funded by the French government Futures Investments, where he has set up a robotic platform to allow high throughput screenings. He is also involved in ANR, the French National Research Agency, and the EU funded projects on Human Gut Microbiota and Health: MetaHIT, Cross-Talk and MetaCardis. Hervé Blottière obtained a PhD in Tumor Immunology from the University of Nantes (France) in 1989, and spent two years at the Wistar Institute (Philadelphia, U.S.A.). His main research interest is the Functional Metagenomics approach to study host-microbiota cross-talk. He has published >135 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. His goal is to provide a better understanding of the symbiosis between gut microbiota and its host and to decipher the mechanisms of interaction between intestinal bacteria and human mucosal cells at the molecular level. Finding these molecular mediators will provide target for manipulation or therapeutics tools to restore symbiosis in chronic diseases.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Probiotics are ‘live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host’. In other words, these friendly bacteria work hard to improve your health. They have strength in numbers – you need to consume a large enough dose of probiotics in order to see their benefits. Evidence shows probiotics positively affect digestive health, but their…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Probiotics are ‘live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host’. In other words, these friendly bacteria work hard to improve your health. They have strength in numbers – you need to consume a large enough dose of probiotics in order to see their benefits. Evidence shows probiotics positively affect digestive health, but their…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The inaugural Mucosal Immunology Course and Symposium were held in Toronto (Canada) July 27-30, 2016, with specific focus on the microbiota and mucosal immunity in health and disease.  The “Principles of Mucosal Immunology” course, held one day prior to the symposium, featured a full day of talks by experts in the field of mucosal immunology. The speakers provided a comprehensive…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

The inaugural Mucosal Immunology Course and Symposium were held in Toronto (Canada) July 27-30, 2016, with specific focus on the microbiota and mucosal immunity in health and disease.  The “Principles of Mucosal Immunology” course, held one day prior to the symposium, featured a full day of talks by experts in the field of mucosal immunology. The speakers provided a comprehensive…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.