Tag Archives: Diet

Over the past five years, the European Union-funded microbiome project MyNewGut, coordinated by Yolanda Sanz (CSIC, Spain), has looked at the gut microbiota’s influence on energy balance, brain development, diet-related diseases and behavior. Now, the project has come to an end and MyNewGut’s main findings and achievements were presented at the MyNewGut Final Conference on 18 October 2018 in Brussels…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Over the past five years, the European Union-funded microbiome project MyNewGut, coordinated by Yolanda Sanz (CSIC, Spain), has looked at the gut microbiota’s influence on energy balance, brain development, diet-related diseases and behavior. Now, the project has come to an end and MyNewGut’s main findings and achievements were presented at the MyNewGut Final Conference on 18 October 2018 in Brussels…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The gut microbiome's role in health and disease was initially supported by studies that found associations between a given microbial profile and a disease—a large number of diseases have been associated with a gut microbiota imbalance—or healthy situation. However, scientists still lack a definition of what a healthy microbiome really is. Furthermore, microbiome science needs to move on from correlation…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The gut microbiome's role in health and disease was initially supported by studies that found associations between a given microbial profile and a disease—a large number of diseases have been associated with a gut microbiota imbalance—or healthy situation. However, scientists still lack a definition of what a healthy microbiome really is. Furthermore, microbiome science needs to move on from correlation…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Besides diet, several other factors such as host genetics, ethnicity, age, medication, chronic diseases, physical exercise, stress, and sleep can all affect gut microbial composition. During the first 2 to 3 years of life, gut microbiota modulation appears to play a critical in later health outcomes. However, little is known about the impact of early lifestyle events on the gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Besides diet, several other factors such as host genetics, ethnicity, age, medication, chronic diseases, physical exercise, stress, and sleep can all affect gut microbial composition. During the first 2 to 3 years of life, gut microbiota modulation appears to play a critical in later health outcomes. However, little is known about the impact of early lifestyle events on the gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A depletion in the levels of butyrate-producing gut bacteria has been found in patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic plaques and type 2 diabetes. Gut bacteria-derived metabolites may be behind the role of the gut microbiome in cardiovascular health, as the intermediate bacterial metabolite trimethylamine in the production of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) promotes atherosclerosis in animal models and is associated with cardiovascular…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A depletion in the levels of butyrate-producing gut bacteria has been found in patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic plaques and type 2 diabetes. Gut bacteria-derived metabolites may be behind the role of the gut microbiome in cardiovascular health, as the intermediate bacterial metabolite trimethylamine in the production of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) promotes atherosclerosis in animal models and is associated with cardiovascular…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is common among patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). For the purpose of this article, CAM is defined as therapies that go beyond traditional pharmacological approaches. Patients turn to CAM for many reasons, but most commonly the patient is either unhappy with their current treatment or is looking for a more holistic…

Natasha Haskey
Natasha Haskey is a Registered Dietitian and PhD student at The Centre for Microbiome and Inflammatory Research at the University of British Columbia – Okanagan (Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada). Her research work focuses on how dietary factors influence the gut microbiome, immune system and clinical disease in inflammatory bowel diseases. She is the co-author of the textbook Gut Microbiota: Interactive Effects on Nutrition and Health, which focuses on the gut microbiome as it relates to nutrition. Follow Natasha on Twitter @nhaskeyRD

The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is common among patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). For the purpose of this article, CAM is defined as therapies that go beyond traditional pharmacological approaches. Patients turn to CAM for many reasons, but most commonly the patient is either unhappy with their current treatment or is looking for a more holistic…

Natasha Haskey
Natasha Haskey is a Registered Dietitian and PhD student at The Centre for Microbiome and Inflammatory Research at the University of British Columbia – Okanagan (Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada). Her research work focuses on how dietary factors influence the gut microbiome, immune system and clinical disease in inflammatory bowel diseases. She is the co-author of the textbook Gut Microbiota: Interactive Effects on Nutrition and Health, which focuses on the gut microbiome as it relates to nutrition. Follow Natasha on Twitter @nhaskeyRD

Although diet, alongside drugs, is a major determinant of gut microbiota composition, little is known about how food components specifically modulate the make-up of our microbiota. A new in vitro study, led by Dr. Sylvia Duncan from the Rowett Institute at University of Aberdeen (Scotland, United Kingdom), explores how different carbohydrate substrates influence the diversity of the human colonic microbiota.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although diet, alongside drugs, is a major determinant of gut microbiota composition, little is known about how food components specifically modulate the make-up of our microbiota. A new in vitro study, led by Dr. Sylvia Duncan from the Rowett Institute at University of Aberdeen (Scotland, United Kingdom), explores how different carbohydrate substrates influence the diversity of the human colonic microbiota.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although twin studies have shown that the gut microbiota includes a heritable component, environmental factors relating to diet, drugs and demographic and anthropometric traits are all major determinants of gut microbial diversity. However, the influence of specific nutrient groups on the human gut microbiome in relation to interindividual variation has yet to be investigated. A new study, led by Prof.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although twin studies have shown that the gut microbiota includes a heritable component, environmental factors relating to diet, drugs and demographic and anthropometric traits are all major determinants of gut microbial diversity. However, the influence of specific nutrient groups on the human gut microbiome in relation to interindividual variation has yet to be investigated. A new study, led by Prof.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

With 2019 just around the corner, we have taken a moment to look back over the year gone by and consider how much great progress was made in gut microbiota research in 2018. With more than 50 articles published on our platform over the past 12 months discussing these achievements and outcomes, it now gives the GMFH publishing team great…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

With 2019 just around the corner, we have taken a moment to look back over the year gone by and consider how much great progress was made in gut microbiota research in 2018. With more than 50 articles published on our platform over the past 12 months discussing these achievements and outcomes, it now gives the GMFH publishing team great…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Rural indigenous populations are nowadays used as a model for studying the current rise in chronic non-communicable diseases, especially obesity. This is down to the previous observation that these populations have the richest and most diverse microbiota ever recorded in humans, including microbial taxa that are absent in westernized populations. Two recent studies explore the impact on the gut microbiome…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Rural indigenous populations are nowadays used as a model for studying the current rise in chronic non-communicable diseases, especially obesity. This is down to the previous observation that these populations have the richest and most diverse microbiota ever recorded in humans, including microbial taxa that are absent in westernized populations. Two recent studies explore the impact on the gut microbiome…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Considering that diet is—together with medication—one of the major influencing factors with regards to gut microbiota composition, research is now focusing on how dietary nutrients may affect gut microbial communities. Specifically, an association was previously found between essential omega-3 fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and gut microbiome diversity in healthy elderly people. However, evidence from randomized trials assessing the effect…

Stéphane Schneider
Professor Stéphane Schneider heads the Nutritional Support Unit in the Gastroenterology and Nutrition Department Archet University Hospital in Nice (France). He is also head of the Nice University Hospital’s food-nutrition liaison committee. Dr. Schneider is vice-president of the French-Speaking Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP), and chairs the Educational and Clinical Practice Committee of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Three years after receiving his M.D. in Gastroenterology from the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, he became an assistant Professor and later a full Professor of Nutrition. He is also certified by the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He obtained a Master of Science from the University of Paris VII, and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University Paul Cezanne, as well as a CME Diploma from Harvard Medical School. His main research interests are intestinal failure and the effects of aging and chronic diseases on nutritional status. He has published 188 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, with an h index of 37. His goal is to help understand better the role of the intestinal ecosystem, as well as the effects of different forms of bacteriotherapy, in digestive and non-digestive disorders featuring dysbiosis.

Considering that diet is—together with medication—one of the major influencing factors with regards to gut microbiota composition, research is now focusing on how dietary nutrients may affect gut microbial communities. Specifically, an association was previously found between essential omega-3 fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and gut microbiome diversity in healthy elderly people. However, evidence from randomized trials assessing the effect…

Stéphane Schneider
Professor Stéphane Schneider heads the Nutritional Support Unit in the Gastroenterology and Nutrition Department Archet University Hospital in Nice (France). He is also head of the Nice University Hospital’s food-nutrition liaison committee. Dr. Schneider is vice-president of the French-Speaking Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP), and chairs the Educational and Clinical Practice Committee of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Three years after receiving his M.D. in Gastroenterology from the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, he became an assistant Professor and later a full Professor of Nutrition. He is also certified by the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He obtained a Master of Science from the University of Paris VII, and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University Paul Cezanne, as well as a CME Diploma from Harvard Medical School. His main research interests are intestinal failure and the effects of aging and chronic diseases on nutritional status. He has published 188 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, with an h index of 37. His goal is to help understand better the role of the intestinal ecosystem, as well as the effects of different forms of bacteriotherapy, in digestive and non-digestive disorders featuring dysbiosis.