Tag Archives: antibiotics

Studies exploring the neonatal microbiome during early life have been performed mainly in the hospital setting, with both mode of delivery and antibiotics having the most profound impact on the microbiome. However, the development of the neonatal microbiome in the absence of routine hospital interventions during delivery has not yet been studied. A new study, led by Prof. Maria Gloria…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Studies exploring the neonatal microbiome during early life have been performed mainly in the hospital setting, with both mode of delivery and antibiotics having the most profound impact on the microbiome. However, the development of the neonatal microbiome in the absence of routine hospital interventions during delivery has not yet been studied. A new study, led by Prof. Maria Gloria…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The use of antibiotics has long been related to a perturbation of the composition and functions of commensal bacterial communities. Some bacteria die in response to antibiotics while gut microbes that harbor antibiotic resistance genes survive. However, little is known regarding the impact of antibiotics on the eradication and recovery of gut microorganisms. A new study, led by Prof. Oluf…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The use of antibiotics has long been related to a perturbation of the composition and functions of commensal bacterial communities. Some bacteria die in response to antibiotics while gut microbes that harbor antibiotic resistance genes survive. However, little is known regarding the impact of antibiotics on the eradication and recovery of gut microorganisms. A new study, led by Prof. Oluf…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Western diets high in fats and sugars, modern lifestyles with stress and sedentarism and the indiscriminate use of antibiotics together with other frequently prescribed drugs -such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors- are major drivers of changes in microbiota composition and gut barrier disruption. (Dr. Maria Rescigno) The GMFH publishing team is pleased to share a new summary…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Western diets high in fats and sugars, modern lifestyles with stress and sedentarism and the indiscriminate use of antibiotics together with other frequently prescribed drugs -such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors- are major drivers of changes in microbiota composition and gut barrier disruption. (Dr. Maria Rescigno) The GMFH publishing team is pleased to share a new summary…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The current antibiotic resistance epidemic is reaching levels higher than previously reported. And the roots of this epidemic can be found not only in an increase in outpatient antibiotic use, but also on the high proportions of resistant bacteria transmitted from food-producing animals. The effects of antibiotics on human gut bacterial diversity is of particular relevance during early life. It…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The current antibiotic resistance epidemic is reaching levels higher than previously reported. And the roots of this epidemic can be found not only in an increase in outpatient antibiotic use, but also on the high proportions of resistant bacteria transmitted from food-producing animals. The effects of antibiotics on human gut bacterial diversity is of particular relevance during early life. It…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics is an important risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the Western world. Recent research has suggested that probiotics may help reduce the incidence of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) among children and adults in both hospital and outpatient settings. A new systematic review and meta-analysis, led by Dr. Bradley Johnston from Dealhousie University (Canada),…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics is an important risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the Western world. Recent research has suggested that probiotics may help reduce the incidence of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) among children and adults in both hospital and outpatient settings. A new systematic review and meta-analysis, led by Dr. Bradley Johnston from Dealhousie University (Canada),…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Our gut microbiota may be involved in mediating interactions between the enteric nervous system and central nervous system (CNS) through the gut-brain axis. The impact of commensal gut microbes on CNS functions have been studied mostly in mice. As such, the antibiotic-induced CNS consequences of manipulating humans' gut microbiota are still unknown. A new double-blinded randomized study led by our…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Our gut microbiota may be involved in mediating interactions between the enteric nervous system and central nervous system (CNS) through the gut-brain axis. The impact of commensal gut microbes on CNS functions have been studied mostly in mice. As such, the antibiotic-induced CNS consequences of manipulating humans' gut microbiota are still unknown. A new double-blinded randomized study led by our…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Although intake of certain non-antibiotic drugs -antidiabetics such as metformin and acarbose, proton pump inhibitors, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and second-generation antipsychotics, opioids and statins- that target human cells have been related to changes in the gut microbiome composition, little is known regarding the extent to which this happens for a broader range of drugs. A recent study, led by Dr.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although intake of certain non-antibiotic drugs -antidiabetics such as metformin and acarbose, proton pump inhibitors, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and second-generation antipsychotics, opioids and statins- that target human cells have been related to changes in the gut microbiome composition, little is known regarding the extent to which this happens for a broader range of drugs. A recent study, led by Dr.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It is known, as we have already explained in this blog, that inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) like Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis, are linked to an imbalance in gut microbiota, known as dysbiosis. Nevertheless, the reason explaining this connection remains a mystery for scientists. It is also known from previous research that oral bacteria do not tend to live in…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

It is known, as we have already explained in this blog, that inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) like Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis, are linked to an imbalance in gut microbiota, known as dysbiosis. Nevertheless, the reason explaining this connection remains a mystery for scientists. It is also known from previous research that oral bacteria do not tend to live in…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Previous evidence from both mouse models and humans has suggested that manipulation of the gut microbiota could help us understand how to deal with the current global obesity epidemic. However, whether the effects of targeting the gut microbiota are due to improved health status in people with overweight or obesity or the result of changes in their gut microbiota composition…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous evidence from both mouse models and humans has suggested that manipulation of the gut microbiota could help us understand how to deal with the current global obesity epidemic. However, whether the effects of targeting the gut microbiota are due to improved health status in people with overweight or obesity or the result of changes in their gut microbiota composition…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

As we have already explained in this blog, the way you are born might impact your health with life-long lasting effects. Epidemiological studies have shown there is a correlation between the increase of C-section in the world in the last decades and the rise of diseases such as allergies, celiac disease or obesity. According to World Health Organisation (WHO), C-section…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

As we have already explained in this blog, the way you are born might impact your health with life-long lasting effects. Epidemiological studies have shown there is a correlation between the increase of C-section in the world in the last decades and the rise of diseases such as allergies, celiac disease or obesity. According to World Health Organisation (WHO), C-section…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina