Nutrition

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This basic research sought to better understand how soluble dietary fibers exert their beneficial effect on body weight and glucose control. The researchers show that two short-chain fatty acids, which are produced by fermentation of soluble fiber by gut bacteria, activate intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN) gene expression through different, but complementary, mechanisms. One of the mechanisms activates IGN gene expression through a…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

This basic research sought to better understand how soluble dietary fibers exert their beneficial effect on body weight and glucose control. The researchers show that two short-chain fatty acids, which are produced by fermentation of soluble fiber by gut bacteria, activate intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN) gene expression through different, but complementary, mechanisms. One of the mechanisms activates IGN gene expression through a…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Filipe De Vadder is a molecular biologist in Gilles Mithieux group and published recently an important article in Cell journal which illustrate how gut microbiota fermentation product could impact neural communication. He accepted for GMFH to give us some highlights. 1) What is the context of this study? Dietary fiber has long been known for its beneficial effects on health,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Filipe De Vadder is a molecular biologist in Gilles Mithieux group and published recently an important article in Cell journal which illustrate how gut microbiota fermentation product could impact neural communication. He accepted for GMFH to give us some highlights. 1) What is the context of this study? Dietary fiber has long been known for its beneficial effects on health,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Machiels et al. recently described that the composition of the faecal microbiota of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis differs from that of healthy individuals: they found a reduction in two well-known butyrate-producing bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, Roseburia hominis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. This has been confirmed in other studies. The dysbiosis found in the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) i.e. Crohn’s…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

Machiels et al. recently described that the composition of the faecal microbiota of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis differs from that of healthy individuals: they found a reduction in two well-known butyrate-producing bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, Roseburia hominis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. This has been confirmed in other studies. The dysbiosis found in the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) i.e. Crohn’s…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

One year at a glance is the compilation of the most relevant and popular content on gut microbiota as published on the GMFH website.   The topic is rapidly growing across all fields of expertise and questions it raises are endless. It seems that hardly a day goes without gut microbiota being related to the health status (enterotypes, second genotype, ageing),…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

One year at a glance is the compilation of the most relevant and popular content on gut microbiota as published on the GMFH website.   The topic is rapidly growing across all fields of expertise and questions it raises are endless. It seems that hardly a day goes without gut microbiota being related to the health status (enterotypes, second genotype, ageing),…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team
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Latest articles

This basic research sought to better understand how soluble dietary fibers exert their beneficial effect on body weight and glucose control. The researchers show that two short-chain fatty acids, which are produced by fermentation of soluble fiber by gut bacteria, activate intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN) gene expression through different, but complementary, mechanisms. One of the mechanisms activates IGN gene expression through a gut-brain neural circuit. Researchers observed that the regulation of IGN in mice is crucial for realizing the metabolic benefits associated with ingestion of soluble fiber. Here is the key point of the study from Gilles Mithieux lab : Propionate directly initiates portal-brain neural communication. Butyrate and propionate induce intestinal gluconeogenesis…

Filipe De Vadder is a molecular biologist in Gilles Mithieux group and published recently an important article in Cell journal which illustrate how gut microbiota fermentation product could impact neural communication. He accepted for GMFH…

Machiels et al. recently described that the composition of the faecal microbiota of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis differs from that of healthy individuals: they found a reduction in two well-known butyrate-producing bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, Roseburia hominis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. This has been confirmed in other studies. The dysbiosis found in the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) i.e. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis share common characteristics but also specificities. Such discoveries will soon help establishing new diagnostic tools and preliminary data are encouraging.  These tools will receive a high interest from clinicians as they will improve the diagnosis in difficult cases, especially at early stages of the disease when…