Nutrition

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Thirty organizations from fifteen countries are coming together to conduct gut microbiome research in a new project called MyNewGut. Professor Yolanda Sanz has been appointed MyNewGut's project coordinator and leads the project's human intervention trials on the gut microbiome's ability to metabolise nutrients and influence energy balance. She is a Professor of Research at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) of the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Thirty organizations from fifteen countries are coming together to conduct gut microbiome research in a new project called MyNewGut. Professor Yolanda Sanz has been appointed MyNewGut's project coordinator and leads the project's human intervention trials on the gut microbiome's ability to metabolise nutrients and influence energy balance. She is a Professor of Research at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) of the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Numerous commensal bacteria present in the gut microbiota produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA’s) particularly acetate, butyrate and propionate. These SCFA’s have been associated with several biological effects upon host. Growing evidence suggests that specific microbes such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Akkermansia muciniphila have favorable effects on intestinal inflammation and obesity, respectively (Sokol et al. PNAS 2008, Everard et al.…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Numerous commensal bacteria present in the gut microbiota produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA’s) particularly acetate, butyrate and propionate. These SCFA’s have been associated with several biological effects upon host. Growing evidence suggests that specific microbes such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Akkermansia muciniphila have favorable effects on intestinal inflammation and obesity, respectively (Sokol et al. PNAS 2008, Everard et al.…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Lawrence and colleagues tracked two subjects' microbiota over a year, collecting 800 fecal and saliva samples associated with 10,000 longitudinal measurements. They first highlighted the evidence for long-term, overall community stability, as differences between individuals were much larger than variation within individuals. They found a small subset of highly abundant core taxa can be found within each stable period. Secondly, they…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Lawrence and colleagues tracked two subjects' microbiota over a year, collecting 800 fecal and saliva samples associated with 10,000 longitudinal measurements. They first highlighted the evidence for long-term, overall community stability, as differences between individuals were much larger than variation within individuals. They found a small subset of highly abundant core taxa can be found within each stable period. Secondly, they…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In an article published online on June 24, 2014 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Zhongyi Chen and Lilu Guo, from the Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, showed that the administration of a modified bacteria expressing therapeutic factors in the gut microbiota could reduce food intake and obesity. By adding an engineered NAPE*-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 strain in the drinking water of mice for 8 weeks,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In an article published online on June 24, 2014 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Zhongyi Chen and Lilu Guo, from the Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, showed that the administration of a modified bacteria expressing therapeutic factors in the gut microbiota could reduce food intake and obesity. By adding an engineered NAPE*-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 strain in the drinking water of mice for 8 weeks,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team
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Thirty organizations from fifteen countries are coming together to conduct gut microbiome research in a new project called MyNewGut. Professor Yolanda Sanz has been appointed MyNewGut's project coordinator and leads the project's human intervention trials on the gut…

Lawrence and colleagues tracked two subjects' microbiota over a year, collecting 800 fecal and saliva samples associated with 10,000 longitudinal measurements. They first highlighted the evidence for long-term, overall community stability, as differences between individuals were…

In an article published online on June 24, 2014 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Zhongyi Chen and Lilu Guo, from the Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, showed that the administration of a modified bacteria expressing therapeutic factors in the gut microbiota could reduce food intake and obesity. By adding an engineered NAPE*-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 strain in the drinking water of mice for 8 weeks, despite a high-fat diet, Zhongyi Chen and Lilu Guo demonstrated a reduction of the levels of obesity in mice. Mice receiving the modified E. coli strain had lower food intake, adiposity, insulin resistance, and hepatosteatosis compared with mice receiving standard water or control bacteria. The protective effects persisted for at least 4 weeks after removal…