Nutrition

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Rural indigenous populations are nowadays used as a model for studying the current rise in chronic non-communicable diseases, especially obesity. This is down to the previous observation that these populations have the richest and most diverse microbiota ever recorded in humans, including microbial taxa that are absent in westernized populations. Two recent studies explore the impact on the gut microbiome…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Rural indigenous populations are nowadays used as a model for studying the current rise in chronic non-communicable diseases, especially obesity. This is down to the previous observation that these populations have the richest and most diverse microbiota ever recorded in humans, including microbial taxa that are absent in westernized populations. Two recent studies explore the impact on the gut microbiome…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The intestinal epithelial barrier is not just a static physical barrier but rather interacts continuously with the gut microbiome and immune cells. An intact intestinal barrier protects the host against invasion of microorganisms and toxins whereas at the same time it allows absorption of essential fluids and nutrients. The pathophysiology of cirrhosis is associated with a dysfunctional intestinal barrier, which…

Oriol Juanola & Rubén Francés
Oriol Juanola is a PhD. student of the Hepatic and Intestinal Immunobiology Group at Miguel Hernández University (Alicante, Spain). The group is interested in molecular and cellular aspects around the immune system that are responsible for the surveillance, response and regulation of homeostasis with our gut microbiota in the so-called "gut-liver axis", a central element in different metabolic pathologies within the scope of the gastroenterology and hepatology. The translation of these aspects, addressed from different methodological perspectives, to the clinical field is also relevant for the Group in order to improve the diagnosis, treatment and/or prognosis of these diseases. Rubén Francés is professor of Immunology and Head of the Hepatic and Intestinal Immunobiology Group at Miguel Hernández University and the Biomedical Research Networking Center in Hepatic and Digestive Diseases (CIBEREHD).

The intestinal epithelial barrier is not just a static physical barrier but rather interacts continuously with the gut microbiome and immune cells. An intact intestinal barrier protects the host against invasion of microorganisms and toxins whereas at the same time it allows absorption of essential fluids and nutrients. The pathophysiology of cirrhosis is associated with a dysfunctional intestinal barrier, which…

Oriol Juanola & Rubén Francés
Oriol Juanola is a PhD. student of the Hepatic and Intestinal Immunobiology Group at Miguel Hernández University (Alicante, Spain). The group is interested in molecular and cellular aspects around the immune system that are responsible for the surveillance, response and regulation of homeostasis with our gut microbiota in the so-called "gut-liver axis", a central element in different metabolic pathologies within the scope of the gastroenterology and hepatology. The translation of these aspects, addressed from different methodological perspectives, to the clinical field is also relevant for the Group in order to improve the diagnosis, treatment and/or prognosis of these diseases. Rubén Francés is professor of Immunology and Head of the Hepatic and Intestinal Immunobiology Group at Miguel Hernández University and the Biomedical Research Networking Center in Hepatic and Digestive Diseases (CIBEREHD).

Considering that diet is—together with medication—one of the major influencing factors with regards to gut microbiota composition, research is now focusing on how dietary nutrients may affect gut microbial communities. Specifically, an association was previously found between essential omega-3 fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and gut microbiome diversity in healthy elderly people. However, evidence from randomized trials assessing the effect…

Stéphane Schneider
Professor Stéphane Schneider heads the Nutritional Support Unit in the Gastroenterology and Nutrition Department Archet University Hospital in Nice (France). He is also head of the Nice University Hospital’s food-nutrition liaison committee. Dr. Schneider is vice-president of the French-Speaking Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP), and chairs the Educational and Clinical Practice Committee of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Three years after receiving his M.D. in Gastroenterology from the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, he became an assistant Professor and later a full Professor of Nutrition. He is also certified by the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He obtained a Master of Science from the University of Paris VII, and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University Paul Cezanne, as well as a CME Diploma from Harvard Medical School. His main research interests are intestinal failure and the effects of aging and chronic diseases on nutritional status. He has published 188 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, with an h index of 37. His goal is to help understand better the role of the intestinal ecosystem, as well as the effects of different forms of bacteriotherapy, in digestive and non-digestive disorders featuring dysbiosis.

Considering that diet is—together with medication—one of the major influencing factors with regards to gut microbiota composition, research is now focusing on how dietary nutrients may affect gut microbial communities. Specifically, an association was previously found between essential omega-3 fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and gut microbiome diversity in healthy elderly people. However, evidence from randomized trials assessing the effect…

Stéphane Schneider
Professor Stéphane Schneider heads the Nutritional Support Unit in the Gastroenterology and Nutrition Department Archet University Hospital in Nice (France). He is also head of the Nice University Hospital’s food-nutrition liaison committee. Dr. Schneider is vice-president of the French-Speaking Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP), and chairs the Educational and Clinical Practice Committee of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Three years after receiving his M.D. in Gastroenterology from the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, he became an assistant Professor and later a full Professor of Nutrition. He is also certified by the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He obtained a Master of Science from the University of Paris VII, and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University Paul Cezanne, as well as a CME Diploma from Harvard Medical School. His main research interests are intestinal failure and the effects of aging and chronic diseases on nutritional status. He has published 188 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, with an h index of 37. His goal is to help understand better the role of the intestinal ecosystem, as well as the effects of different forms of bacteriotherapy, in digestive and non-digestive disorders featuring dysbiosis.

Western diets high in fats and sugars, modern lifestyles with stress and sedentarism and the indiscriminate use of antibiotics together with other frequently prescribed drugs -such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors- are major drivers of changes in microbiota composition and gut barrier disruption. (Dr. Maria Rescigno) The GMFH publishing team is pleased to share a new summary…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Western diets high in fats and sugars, modern lifestyles with stress and sedentarism and the indiscriminate use of antibiotics together with other frequently prescribed drugs -such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors- are major drivers of changes in microbiota composition and gut barrier disruption. (Dr. Maria Rescigno) The GMFH publishing team is pleased to share a new summary…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team
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Rural indigenous populations are nowadays used as a model for studying the current rise in chronic non-communicable diseases, especially obesity. This is down to the previous observation that these populations have the richest and most…

Considering that diet is—together with medication—one of the major influencing factors with regards to gut microbiota composition, research is now focusing on how dietary nutrients may affect gut microbial communities. Specifically, an association was previously…