Metabolic conditions

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The gut microbiota has become a new player in the onset and development of metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies. One gut bacterium that has been positively associated with leanness in mice and humans is Akkermansia muciniphila, which is naturally present in the gut microbiota of healthy people. In 2017, our research team at UCLouvain (Belgium) found that a pasteurized…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

The gut microbiota has become a new player in the onset and development of metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies. One gut bacterium that has been positively associated with leanness in mice and humans is Akkermansia muciniphila, which is naturally present in the gut microbiota of healthy people. In 2017, our research team at UCLouvain (Belgium) found that a pasteurized…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Over 350 physicians, dietitians, nutritionists, advanced practice providers and researchers from 49 countries gathered in Miami (USA), on March 23-24, for the 8th edition of the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2019, where world-renowned experts in the field discussed the latest evidence on the interaction between diet, nutrition and the gut microbiome. With Gail Hecht and Francisco Guarner as…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Over 350 physicians, dietitians, nutritionists, advanced practice providers and researchers from 49 countries gathered in Miami (USA), on March 23-24, for the 8th edition of the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2019, where world-renowned experts in the field discussed the latest evidence on the interaction between diet, nutrition and the gut microbiome. With Gail Hecht and Francisco Guarner as…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Genes from the gut microbiota encode for a wide range of metabolic activities that allow commensal microbes to ferment dietary fibers and prebiotics into metabolites that include short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Of these, propionate has been shown to trigger the secretion of gut peptides that take part in regulating appetite and glucose metabolism and reducing inflammation. Although colonic propionate…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Genes from the gut microbiota encode for a wide range of metabolic activities that allow commensal microbes to ferment dietary fibers and prebiotics into metabolites that include short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Of these, propionate has been shown to trigger the secretion of gut peptides that take part in regulating appetite and glucose metabolism and reducing inflammation. Although colonic propionate…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although twin research has shown that gut microbiota features a heritable component, we do not know whether gut microbial genetic variations can shape phenotypic differences that affect host health. A new study, led by Dr. Eran Segal from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot (Israel), has identified structural variations in gut microbial genomes that vary across people and are…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Although twin research has shown that gut microbiota features a heritable component, we do not know whether gut microbial genetic variations can shape phenotypic differences that affect host health. A new study, led by Dr. Eran Segal from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot (Israel), has identified structural variations in gut microbial genomes that vary across people and are…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team
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Latest articles

The gut microbiota has become a new player in the onset and development of metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies. One gut bacterium that has been positively associated with leanness in mice and humans is…

Over 350 physicians, dietitians, nutritionists, advanced practice providers and researchers from 49 countries gathered in Miami (USA), on March 23-24, for the 8th edition of the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2019, where world-renowned…

Although twin research has shown that gut microbiota features a heritable component, we do not know whether gut microbial genetic variations can shape phenotypic differences that affect host health. A new study, led by Dr.…