Gut brain axis

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Parkinson’s disease is caused by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and recent studies have widened the immune system and the gut microbiota's contribution to the disease. A new study in mice, led by researchers from the Université de Montréal and McGill University in Canada, shows the involvement of intestinal infections as a trigger in Parkinson’s disease through autoimmune mechanisms.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Parkinson’s disease is caused by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and recent studies have widened the immune system and the gut microbiota's contribution to the disease. A new study in mice, led by researchers from the Université de Montréal and McGill University in Canada, shows the involvement of intestinal infections as a trigger in Parkinson’s disease through autoimmune mechanisms.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The microorganisms inhabiting the human gut can alter the chemical structures of drugs, leading to changes in their bioavailability, toxicity and efficacy. Although the gut microbial enzymes responsible for these chemical modifications are poorly understood, microbial mediation of therapeutic effects has been reported for metformin, chemotherapeutic drugs and antidepressants. A gut microbial enzymatic pathway is involved in metabolizing the drug…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The microorganisms inhabiting the human gut can alter the chemical structures of drugs, leading to changes in their bioavailability, toxicity and efficacy. Although the gut microbial enzymes responsible for these chemical modifications are poorly understood, microbial mediation of therapeutic effects has been reported for metformin, chemotherapeutic drugs and antidepressants. A gut microbial enzymatic pathway is involved in metabolizing the drug…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A current challenge in gut microbiome science is that of characterizing the effects of food groups on gut microbial communities instead of focusing on isolated nutrients. Although prebiotics provide health benefits by specifically altering the composition or activity of the gut microbiota, not all dietary fibers are prebiotics and they can benefit gut bacterial groups in different ways. A new…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A current challenge in gut microbiome science is that of characterizing the effects of food groups on gut microbial communities instead of focusing on isolated nutrients. Although prebiotics provide health benefits by specifically altering the composition or activity of the gut microbiota, not all dietary fibers are prebiotics and they can benefit gut bacterial groups in different ways. A new…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team
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Latest articles

Parkinson’s disease is caused by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and recent studies have widened the immune system and the gut microbiota's contribution to the disease. A new study in mice, led by researchers…

The microorganisms inhabiting the human gut can alter the chemical structures of drugs, leading to changes in their bioavailability, toxicity and efficacy. Although the gut microbial enzymes responsible for these chemical modifications are poorly understood,…

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons,…