Digestive health

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Recent research has involved genetics, altered mucosal immune responses, environmental factors and the gut microbiome as major players in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Given that some patients do not respond to conventional treatments, scientists are currently exploring new gut microbiome-targeted therapeutic approaches to improve disease course. A new study, led by Dr. Ramnik Joseph Xavier from the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Recent research has involved genetics, altered mucosal immune responses, environmental factors and the gut microbiome as major players in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Given that some patients do not respond to conventional treatments, scientists are currently exploring new gut microbiome-targeted therapeutic approaches to improve disease course. A new study, led by Dr. Ramnik Joseph Xavier from the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Traditionally, the diet low in fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharide and polyol (FODMAP) - best as a 2-phased intervention, with strict reduction of all slowly absorbed or indigestible carbohydrates (i.e., FODMAPs) followed by reintroduction of some of them according to tolerance - has been widely used for overall gastrointestinal symptom relief in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, decreasing…

Andrea Hardy
Registered Dietitian, Andrea Hardy from Calgary, Canada specializes in gastrointestinal disorders and the gut microbiome. She is recognized as Canada’s gut health dietitian – educating health care professionals and the public on the pivotal role nutrition plays in gut health. You can find her at Ignite Nutrition, or on Twitter (@AndreaHardyRD).

Traditionally, the diet low in fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharide and polyol (FODMAP) - best as a 2-phased intervention, with strict reduction of all slowly absorbed or indigestible carbohydrates (i.e., FODMAPs) followed by reintroduction of some of them according to tolerance - has been widely used for overall gastrointestinal symptom relief in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, decreasing…

Andrea Hardy
Registered Dietitian, Andrea Hardy from Calgary, Canada specializes in gastrointestinal disorders and the gut microbiome. She is recognized as Canada’s gut health dietitian – educating health care professionals and the public on the pivotal role nutrition plays in gut health. You can find her at Ignite Nutrition, or on Twitter (@AndreaHardyRD).

The ability to distinguish between “self” and “non-self” is the hallmark of a healthy immune system. Immune cells must be able to recognize pathogenic “non-self” antigens (i.e. microbial pathogens) and mount an appropriate immune response while remaining quiescent towards “self” agents (i.e. commensal microbes) that are harmless to our health. Nowhere else in the human body is this process more…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

The ability to distinguish between “self” and “non-self” is the hallmark of a healthy immune system. Immune cells must be able to recognize pathogenic “non-self” antigens (i.e. microbial pathogens) and mount an appropriate immune response while remaining quiescent towards “self” agents (i.e. commensal microbes) that are harmless to our health. Nowhere else in the human body is this process more…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

Mutations that lead to an impairment of tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2 (Tet2) function or/and expression -  a gene that encodes an epigenetic modifier enzyme - have been related to the development of haematopoietic malignancies in both mice and humans. According to a new study in Nature by Marlies Meisel and Reinhard Hinterleitner from the University of Chicago and collaborators, gut…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Mutations that lead to an impairment of tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2 (Tet2) function or/and expression -  a gene that encodes an epigenetic modifier enzyme - have been related to the development of haematopoietic malignancies in both mice and humans. According to a new study in Nature by Marlies Meisel and Reinhard Hinterleitner from the University of Chicago and collaborators, gut…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.
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Latest articles

Recent research has involved genetics, altered mucosal immune responses, environmental factors and the gut microbiome as major players in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Given that some patients do not respond to conventional…

Traditionally, the diet low in fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharide and polyol (FODMAP) - best as a 2-phased intervention, with strict reduction of all slowly absorbed or indigestible carbohydrates (i.e., FODMAPs) followed by reintroduction of…

The ability to distinguish between “self” and “non-self” is the hallmark of a healthy immune system. Immune cells must be able to recognize pathogenic “non-self” antigens (i.e. microbial pathogens) and mount an appropriate immune response…

Mutations that lead to an impairment of tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2 (Tet2) function or/and expression -  a gene that encodes an epigenetic modifier enzyme - have been related to the development of haematopoietic malignancies in…