Digestive health

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The fact some people respond to a drug treatment while for others the same treatment is totally ineffective may depend on our gut microbiota. In other words, after a drug is administered orally, it could either be absorbed into the bloodstream and metabolized by the liver, or it remains in the intestine where it can be metabolized by the gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The fact some people respond to a drug treatment while for others the same treatment is totally ineffective may depend on our gut microbiota. In other words, after a drug is administered orally, it could either be absorbed into the bloodstream and metabolized by the liver, or it remains in the intestine where it can be metabolized by the gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Imbalances in the small intestinal microbiome can drive clinical consequences in the form of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), characterized by higher numbers of bacteria and a distribution more commonly associated with the colon. In recent times, SIBO has been recognized as a frequent cause of common gastrointestinal conditions that share risk factors such as maldigestion and malabsorption. Methods used…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Imbalances in the small intestinal microbiome can drive clinical consequences in the form of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), characterized by higher numbers of bacteria and a distribution more commonly associated with the colon. In recent times, SIBO has been recognized as a frequent cause of common gastrointestinal conditions that share risk factors such as maldigestion and malabsorption. Methods used…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The functional metagenomic screening of the human gut microbiome gives us a better understanding of how microbial genes shape almost all aspects of physiology. Although an important number of microbial species have yet to be characterized, next generation approaches have increased the number of gut microorganism genomes that can be mapped. For instance, analysis of the gut metagenome has provided…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The functional metagenomic screening of the human gut microbiome gives us a better understanding of how microbial genes shape almost all aspects of physiology. Although an important number of microbial species have yet to be characterized, next generation approaches have increased the number of gut microorganism genomes that can be mapped. For instance, analysis of the gut metagenome has provided…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The gut microbiota has become a new player in the onset and development of metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies. One gut bacterium that has been positively associated with leanness in mice and humans is Akkermansia muciniphila, which is naturally present in the gut microbiota of healthy people. In 2017, our research team at UCLouvain (Belgium) found that a pasteurized…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

The gut microbiota has become a new player in the onset and development of metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies. One gut bacterium that has been positively associated with leanness in mice and humans is Akkermansia muciniphila, which is naturally present in the gut microbiota of healthy people. In 2017, our research team at UCLouvain (Belgium) found that a pasteurized…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.
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Latest articles

The fact some people respond to a drug treatment while for others the same treatment is totally ineffective may depend on our gut microbiota. In other words, after a drug is administered orally, it could…

Imbalances in the small intestinal microbiome can drive clinical consequences in the form of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), characterized by higher numbers of bacteria and a distribution more commonly associated with the colon. In…

The functional metagenomic screening of the human gut microbiome gives us a better understanding of how microbial genes shape almost all aspects of physiology. Although an important number of microbial species have yet to be…

The gut microbiota has become a new player in the onset and development of metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies. One gut bacterium that has been positively associated with leanness in mice and humans is…