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(Berlin, October 16, 2013) Clinicians with gastrointestinal (GI) patients often wish – and are asked by their patients – to recommend specific probiotics. However, a clear and accessible evidence-based reference guide on the role and effectiveness of specific probiotics and their clinical use for managing particular lower gastrointestinal problems has been lacking so far. Now a new reference guide, which was supported and facilitated by the European Society for Primary Care Gastroenterology (ESPCG), with a focus on the requirements of primary care physicians, provides the first practical consensus on the role of specific probiotics in the management of lower GI symptoms in adults in clinical practice. The guide will also…

On Monday 30th September, 2013, UC Davis hosted the 2013 CHAMMP (Center of Health for Advancing Microbiome and Mucosal Protection) Symposium on "Advancing microbiome and mucosal protection in chronic inflammatory disease and development". The event welcomed 8 presentations, with a keynote by Dr Jeffrey Gordon, and ended with a discussion panel.   You can check the program on this page.   Dr Jonathan Eisen, co-moderator of the discussion panel, also put together a Storify gathering tweets from the event :     [<a href="//storify.com/phylogenomics/ucdavis-chammp" target="_blank">View the story "#UCDavis #CHAMMP symposium on microbiomes" on Storify</a>]

The team of Jeffrey Gordon (Ridaura et al. Science 2013) published that the phenotype of obesity (increased adiposity) of an obese twin in a discordant twin pair is transmissible. In other words, they found that mice receiving an obese twin’s fecal microbiota display a greater fat mass than the mice receiving lean twin’s gut microbes. Cohousing is widely used in mice studies to investigate the impact of sharing microbial communities (mice are coprophagic) on the host phenotype. In this paper, they found that cohousing obese and lean animals prevents increased adiposity. Thus obese cohoused mice exhibited a lower increased adiposity compared with obese animals that had never been exposed to…

Some individuals seem to be more susceptible to develop obesity or are more resistant to weight loss during dietary restriction. Emerging evidence suggest that few bacterial genera (i.e., Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia) are inversely associated with obesity, metabolic inflammation and related metabolic disorders in both human and rodent studies. However so far, a common integrative factor is still being sought. Researchers from the MetaHIT and MicroObes consortium published in Nature two joint-papers showing that richness of gut microbial genes and eventually microbial composition correlates with metabolic markers (e.g., body weight, fat mass, glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammation) and susceptibility to lose weight upon dietary restriction. Interestingly, using different sequencing…

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(Berlin, October 16, 2013) Clinicians with gastrointestinal (GI) patients often wish – and are asked by their patients – to recommend specific probiotics. However, a clear and accessible evidence-based reference guide on the role and effectiveness of specific probiotics and their clinical use for managing particular lower gastrointestinal problems has been lacking so far. Now a new reference guide, which was supported and facilitated by the European Society for Primary Care Gastroenterology (ESPCG), with a focus on the requirements of primary care physicians, provides the first practical consensus on the role of specific probiotics in the management of lower GI symptoms in adults in clinical practice. The guide will also…

On Monday 30th September, 2013, UC Davis hosted the 2013 CHAMMP (Center of Health for Advancing Microbiome and Mucosal Protection) Symposium on "Advancing microbiome and mucosal protection in chronic inflammatory disease and development". The event welcomed 8 presentations, with a keynote by Dr Jeffrey Gordon, and ended with a discussion panel.   You can check the program on this page.   Dr Jonathan Eisen, co-moderator of the discussion panel, also put together a Storify gathering tweets from the event :     [<a href="//storify.com/phylogenomics/ucdavis-chammp" target="_blank">View the story "#UCDavis #CHAMMP symposium on microbiomes" on Storify</a>]

The team of Jeffrey Gordon (Ridaura et al. Science 2013) published that the phenotype of obesity (increased adiposity) of an obese twin in a discordant twin pair is transmissible. In other words, they found that mice receiving an obese twin’s fecal microbiota display a greater fat mass than the mice receiving lean twin’s gut microbes. Cohousing is widely used in mice studies to investigate the impact of sharing microbial communities (mice are coprophagic) on the host phenotype. In this paper, they found that cohousing obese and lean animals prevents increased adiposity. Thus obese cohoused mice exhibited a lower increased adiposity compared with obese animals that had never been exposed to…

Some individuals seem to be more susceptible to develop obesity or are more resistant to weight loss during dietary restriction. Emerging evidence suggest that few bacterial genera (i.e., Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia) are inversely associated with obesity, metabolic inflammation and related metabolic disorders in both human and rodent studies. However so far, a common integrative factor is still being sought. Researchers from the MetaHIT and MicroObes consortium published in Nature two joint-papers showing that richness of gut microbial genes and eventually microbial composition correlates with metabolic markers (e.g., body weight, fat mass, glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammation) and susceptibility to lose weight upon dietary restriction. Interestingly, using different sequencing…

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