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Stefka and colleagues studied whether food allergy could be affected by gut microbiota. Germ-free, antibiotic treated and conventional mice have been exposed to a peanut allergen. They found that sensitization to the allergen increased in germ free and antibiotic treated mice. Using a a mix of Clostridia strains, they reversed the sensitization process and demonstrate that this mix could minimize reaction to the allergen. Andrew T. Stefka, Taylor Feehley, Prabhanshu Tripathi, Ju Qiu, Kathy McCoy, Sarkis K. Mazmanian, Melissa Y. Tjota, Goo-Young Seo, Severine Cao, Betty R. Theriault, Dionysios A. Antonopoulos, Liang Zhou, Eugene B. Chang, Yang-Xin Fu, and Cathryn R. Nagler. Commensal bacteria protect against food allergen sensitization. PNAS…

Stein and colleagues describe in their study, published in PLOS computational biology, how time series can help to study dynamics of the microbiota. Moreover, unlike usual cross sectional studies which lack a mechanistic understanding of…

Thirty organizations from fifteen countries are coming together to conduct gut microbiome research in a new project called MyNewGut. Professor Yolanda Sanz has been appointed MyNewGut's project coordinator and leads the project's human intervention trials on the gut…

Antibiotics, while essential in many cases, can disrupt the indigenous gut microbiota and leave a patient susceptible to antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. In this study, researchers wanted to find out the potential benefit of proactive treatment with probiotics before the administration of antibiotics.   To do that, mice with a previously abolished microbiota were given either a β-lactamase-producing anaerobe (i.e. the probiotic) or a saline solution. The β-lactamase enzymes, produced by some bacteria, inactivate β-lactam antibiotics, which are among the most widely used worldwide. After the treatment (with the probiotic strain, or the saline solution), the animals received 3 days of the antibiotic ceftriaxone, and were subsequently exposed to pathogens (vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus,…

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Latest articles

Stefka and colleagues studied whether food allergy could be affected by gut microbiota. Germ-free, antibiotic treated and conventional mice have been exposed to a peanut allergen. They found that sensitization to the allergen increased in germ free and antibiotic treated mice. Using a a mix of Clostridia strains, they reversed the sensitization process and demonstrate that this mix could minimize reaction to the allergen. Andrew T. Stefka, Taylor Feehley, Prabhanshu Tripathi, Ju Qiu, Kathy McCoy, Sarkis K. Mazmanian, Melissa Y. Tjota, Goo-Young Seo, Severine Cao, Betty R. Theriault, Dionysios A. Antonopoulos, Liang Zhou, Eugene B. Chang, Yang-Xin Fu, and Cathryn R. Nagler. Commensal bacteria protect against food allergen sensitization. PNAS…

Stein and colleagues describe in their study, published in PLOS computational biology, how time series can help to study dynamics of the microbiota. Moreover, unlike usual cross sectional studies which lack a mechanistic understanding of…

Thirty organizations from fifteen countries are coming together to conduct gut microbiome research in a new project called MyNewGut. Professor Yolanda Sanz has been appointed MyNewGut's project coordinator and leads the project's human intervention trials on the gut…

Antibiotics, while essential in many cases, can disrupt the indigenous gut microbiota and leave a patient susceptible to antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. In this study, researchers wanted to find out the potential benefit of proactive treatment with probiotics before the administration of antibiotics.   To do that, mice with a previously abolished microbiota were given either a β-lactamase-producing anaerobe (i.e. the probiotic) or a saline solution. The β-lactamase enzymes, produced by some bacteria, inactivate β-lactam antibiotics, which are among the most widely used worldwide. After the treatment (with the probiotic strain, or the saline solution), the animals received 3 days of the antibiotic ceftriaxone, and were subsequently exposed to pathogens (vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus,…

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