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The beneficial effects of dietary fibers on gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders has been widely studied. However, the consequences of dietary fiber intake on inflammation outside of the intestine, for instance, in the lung has been poorly documented. Here, Trompette and colleagues showed that dietary fiber content changed the composition of the gut and lung microbiota in mice, in particular by altering the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes. They observed that low-fiber diet (<0.3%) led to microbiota dominated by Firmicutes. By contrast, the proportion of Bacteroidaceae was found increased in mice fed a diet rich in fiber (4% supplemented with 30% cellulose or pectin). Interestingly, it was previously reported that Bacteroidetes phylum…

Catherine Juste studied agronomic engineering, and then became Doctor of Science, specializing in nutrition and physiology. She became passionate about environmental microbiology and is currently developing environmental proteomics of the gut microbes at INRA. She…

Outnumbering our own cells more than 10 to one, the microbes thriving peacefully in the human body help keep us healthy. Recently, research findings have showed that microbial guests may also aid in the treatment of disease. Some of those studies were summarised by Elisabeth Pennisi in the “News and analysis” section of the Science Magazine, in an article titled “Cancer therapies use a little help from microbial friends”, in November 2013.   Pennisi highlighted two studies carried out in mice that illustrated the complex interplay of microbial activity and function with the immune system and therapies. In particular, the authors of both studies found that gut bacteria bolstered the…

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Latest articles

The beneficial effects of dietary fibers on gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders has been widely studied. However, the consequences of dietary fiber intake on inflammation outside of the intestine, for instance, in the lung has been poorly documented. Here, Trompette and colleagues showed that dietary fiber content changed the composition of the gut and lung microbiota in mice, in particular by altering the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes. They observed that low-fiber diet (<0.3%) led to microbiota dominated by Firmicutes. By contrast, the proportion of Bacteroidaceae was found increased in mice fed a diet rich in fiber (4% supplemented with 30% cellulose or pectin). Interestingly, it was previously reported that Bacteroidetes phylum…

Catherine Juste studied agronomic engineering, and then became Doctor of Science, specializing in nutrition and physiology. She became passionate about environmental microbiology and is currently developing environmental proteomics of the gut microbes at INRA. She…

Outnumbering our own cells more than 10 to one, the microbes thriving peacefully in the human body help keep us healthy. Recently, research findings have showed that microbial guests may also aid in the treatment of disease. Some of those studies were summarised by Elisabeth Pennisi in the “News and analysis” section of the Science Magazine, in an article titled “Cancer therapies use a little help from microbial friends”, in November 2013.   Pennisi highlighted two studies carried out in mice that illustrated the complex interplay of microbial activity and function with the immune system and therapies. In particular, the authors of both studies found that gut bacteria bolstered the…

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