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Baguette and sliced bread lovers, we’ve got good news for you! For years,  it’s been criticized for its bad nutritional reputation and has been shunned as a mere glutinous slab lacking any health benefits, but…

Exercise is known to be essential for both our mental and our physical health. It is good for the heart, for keeping weight down and may help prevent some kinds of cancer; moreover, it can…

According to the results of a recent study with rodents by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), antibiotics treatments during pregnancy may put newborns at risk of disease by challenging their immune system. When they’re born, infants move from a largely sterile environment, their mothers’ womb, to one full of microorganisms, the outer world. Both animal and humans learn to adapt to this situation by being exposed to their mother’s microbes from the very moment of birth, as delivery kick-starts the immune system of the newborns. The results of the study, published in Nature Medicine, suggest that the mother’s gut microbiota may play an essential role in this transference as…

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Last News

Baguette and sliced bread lovers, we’ve got good news for you! For years,  it’s been criticized for its bad nutritional reputation and has been shunned as a mere glutinous slab lacking any health benefits, but…

Exercise is known to be essential for both our mental and our physical health. It is good for the heart, for keeping weight down and may help prevent some kinds of cancer; moreover, it can…

According to the results of a recent study with rodents by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), antibiotics treatments during pregnancy may put newborns at risk of disease by challenging their immune system. When they’re born, infants move from a largely sterile environment, their mothers’ womb, to one full of microorganisms, the outer world. Both animal and humans learn to adapt to this situation by being exposed to their mother’s microbes from the very moment of birth, as delivery kick-starts the immune system of the newborns. The results of the study, published in Nature Medicine, suggest that the mother’s gut microbiota may play an essential role in this transference as…