Gut microbiota

Latest articles

Until not so long, it was thought that disturbances in gut microbiota, what is medically called ‘dysbiosis’, were associated to disease. Nevertheless, scientists have discovered that there is a particular period in life where changes reveal to be key to health, and that moment is pregnancy. Researcher Omry Koren, from Bar Ilan University, in Israel, studies what happens to microbiota…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Until not so long, it was thought that disturbances in gut microbiota, what is medically called ‘dysbiosis’, were associated to disease. Nevertheless, scientists have discovered that there is a particular period in life where changes reveal to be key to health, and that moment is pregnancy. Researcher Omry Koren, from Bar Ilan University, in Israel, studies what happens to microbiota…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For a long time, babies were thought to be born germ-free. Now we know they carry some bacteria and that the delivery mode can influence the microbiota they are starting life with and even their health. Researcher José Clemente, assistant professor at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, investigates whether we can revert the effects…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For a long time, babies were thought to be born germ-free. Now we know they carry some bacteria and that the delivery mode can influence the microbiota they are starting life with and even their health. Researcher José Clemente, assistant professor at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, investigates whether we can revert the effects…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Although breast milk is a baby's first food, it also contains certain compounds – especially some fibres and oligosaccharides –that are not meant for the infant but for an army of bacterial diners that start colonising the child's gut at birth. “Breast milk's first impact is to favour the colonisation of the gut by specific bacterial groups that can digest these…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Although breast milk is a baby's first food, it also contains certain compounds – especially some fibres and oligosaccharides –that are not meant for the infant but for an army of bacterial diners that start colonising the child's gut at birth. “Breast milk's first impact is to favour the colonisation of the gut by specific bacterial groups that can digest these…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Babies are born with immature immune systems. Until now, it was believed that the birth process was the first opportunity for microorganisms from the mother to colonize the baby’s gut and, thus, to shape the immune system. Now, a team formed by German and Swiss scientists have discovered that this interaction with the baby’s immune system starts much earlier than…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Babies are born with immature immune systems. Until now, it was believed that the birth process was the first opportunity for microorganisms from the mother to colonize the baby’s gut and, thus, to shape the immune system. Now, a team formed by German and Swiss scientists have discovered that this interaction with the baby’s immune system starts much earlier than…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina
Twitter
News archive

Access from here to the chronological archive of news of this site

Access archive
Latest articles

Until not so long, it was thought that disturbances in gut microbiota, what is medically called ‘dysbiosis’, were associated to disease. Nevertheless, scientists have discovered that there is a particular period in life where changes…

Babies are born with immature immune systems. Until now, it was believed that the birth process was the first opportunity for microorganisms from the mother to colonize the baby’s gut and, thus, to shape the…