Probiotics

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Research & Practice

Using a stress model in animals, Da Silva and colleagues induced gut hyperpermeability and visceral hypersensitivity as well as a shift in O-glycosylation of mucins, associated with flattening and loss of the mucus layer cohesive properties. The probiotic L. farciminis bound to intestinal Muc2 prevented stress-induced functional alterations and changes in mucin O-glycosylation and mucus physical properties and restored epithelial…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Using a stress model in animals, Da Silva and colleagues induced gut hyperpermeability and visceral hypersensitivity as well as a shift in O-glycosylation of mucins, associated with flattening and loss of the mucus layer cohesive properties. The probiotic L. farciminis bound to intestinal Muc2 prevented stress-induced functional alterations and changes in mucin O-glycosylation and mucus physical properties and restored epithelial…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

In an article published online on June 24, 2014 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Zhongyi Chen and Lilu Guo, from the Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, showed that the administration of a modified bacteria expressing therapeutic factors in the gut microbiota could reduce food intake and obesity. By adding an engineered NAPE*-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 strain in the drinking water of mice for 8 weeks,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In an article published online on June 24, 2014 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Zhongyi Chen and Lilu Guo, from the Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, showed that the administration of a modified bacteria expressing therapeutic factors in the gut microbiota could reduce food intake and obesity. By adding an engineered NAPE*-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 strain in the drinking water of mice for 8 weeks,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A Nature Medicine paper by Hitesh S Deshmukh and colleagues from the Division of Neonatology, Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsilvania, USA reports an important aspect to the use of antibiotics in the integrity of the immune system in the newborn. Neonatal colonization by microbes, which begins immediately after birth, is influenced by gestational age and the mother’s microbiota and is…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A Nature Medicine paper by Hitesh S Deshmukh and colleagues from the Division of Neonatology, Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsilvania, USA reports an important aspect to the use of antibiotics in the integrity of the immune system in the newborn. Neonatal colonization by microbes, which begins immediately after birth, is influenced by gestational age and the mother’s microbiota and is…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

At the occasion of the "New therapies in coeliac disease" conference hosted by Columbia University in New-York on March 20, 2014, Dr. Elena Verdú, our expert in Nutrition, is sharing with us the last trends in research in the field of Coeliac Disease (CeD), introducing the idea of a role of probiotics in the treatment of CeD. Presence of intestinal dysbiosis…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

At the occasion of the "New therapies in coeliac disease" conference hosted by Columbia University in New-York on March 20, 2014, Dr. Elena Verdú, our expert in Nutrition, is sharing with us the last trends in research in the field of Coeliac Disease (CeD), introducing the idea of a role of probiotics in the treatment of CeD. Presence of intestinal dysbiosis…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

(Berlin, October 16, 2013) Clinicians with gastrointestinal (GI) patients often wish – and are asked by their patients – to recommend specific probiotics. However, a clear and accessible evidence-based reference guide on the role and effectiveness of specific probiotics and their clinical use for managing particular lower gastrointestinal problems has been lacking so far. Now a new reference guide, which…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

(Berlin, October 16, 2013) Clinicians with gastrointestinal (GI) patients often wish – and are asked by their patients – to recommend specific probiotics. However, a clear and accessible evidence-based reference guide on the role and effectiveness of specific probiotics and their clinical use for managing particular lower gastrointestinal problems has been lacking so far. Now a new reference guide, which…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team