Probiotics

News Watch

Most of us would probably still remember when in childhood we were sick with a stomach bug, and grandma kept telling us to eat yogurt to quickly recover. That old remedy did work, science says. Fermented foods, like yogurt, traditionally present for centuries in our diets, help us stay healthy. How? Taking care of our gut microbiota that, in return,…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Most of us would probably still remember when in childhood we were sick with a stomach bug, and grandma kept telling us to eat yogurt to quickly recover. That old remedy did work, science says. Fermented foods, like yogurt, traditionally present for centuries in our diets, help us stay healthy. How? Taking care of our gut microbiota that, in return,…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

When in love, we get butterflies in our stomach or if the nerves really hit before taking an exam, we might get diarrhea. Our brain and gut are in constant contact as we undergo experiences in our daily lives. The gut, for instance, sends information to the brain about what we eat, if we have enough nutrients to stay healthy…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

When in love, we get butterflies in our stomach or if the nerves really hit before taking an exam, we might get diarrhea. Our brain and gut are in constant contact as we undergo experiences in our daily lives. The gut, for instance, sends information to the brain about what we eat, if we have enough nutrients to stay healthy…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Since Dutchman Antony van Leeuwenhoek discovered bacteria and protozoa for the first time ever in history in the 17th century, much has been learnt about the microscopic world we live in and the one that lives inside us. Our microbiota, and specially our gut microbiota, have been studied intensely over the past 15 years. A huge amount of data is…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Since Dutchman Antony van Leeuwenhoek discovered bacteria and protozoa for the first time ever in history in the 17th century, much has been learnt about the microscopic world we live in and the one that lives inside us. Our microbiota, and specially our gut microbiota, have been studied intensely over the past 15 years. A huge amount of data is…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Akkermansia muciniphila. Despite the tricky moniker, keep this name in mind, because it is the next generation of promising probiotics coming from your gut microbiota. Yes, you have got it right. Recent studies have already shed light on the bunch of positive effects it has on our overall health. For instance, during the last Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Akkermansia muciniphila. Despite the tricky moniker, keep this name in mind, because it is the next generation of promising probiotics coming from your gut microbiota. Yes, you have got it right. Recent studies have already shed light on the bunch of positive effects it has on our overall health. For instance, during the last Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

During the 7th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2018, held in Rome, we had the opportunity to talk to Andrea Hardy, Registered Dietitian from Calgary (Canada), about the role of the dietitians and nutritionists as gut health ambassadors. “I would like to press people to think of gut health as being for everybody," states Hardy. In the interview, the dietitian…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

During the 7th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2018, held in Rome, we had the opportunity to talk to Andrea Hardy, Registered Dietitian from Calgary (Canada), about the role of the dietitians and nutritionists as gut health ambassadors. “I would like to press people to think of gut health as being for everybody," states Hardy. In the interview, the dietitian…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

The gut microbiome is currently considered to be a potential target for preventing conditions that have been associated with imbalances in gut microbial communities. In addition to medication, diet is a major modulator of gut microbiota composition, and this is explained by the way some fibers (containing microbiota-accessible carbohydrates) can be selectively utilized by commensal microbes, thus conferring a health…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The gut microbiome is currently considered to be a potential target for preventing conditions that have been associated with imbalances in gut microbial communities. In addition to medication, diet is a major modulator of gut microbiota composition, and this is explained by the way some fibers (containing microbiota-accessible carbohydrates) can be selectively utilized by commensal microbes, thus conferring a health…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) (such as acetate, propionate, butyrate) are byproducts of bacterial fermentation in the gut and are frequently reduced in people with diabetes, obesity, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. A growing body of research points to the role of SCFAs in governing the mechanism by which the gut microbiome affects host physiology - an exciting prospect considering the current…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) (such as acetate, propionate, butyrate) are byproducts of bacterial fermentation in the gut and are frequently reduced in people with diabetes, obesity, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. A growing body of research points to the role of SCFAs in governing the mechanism by which the gut microbiome affects host physiology - an exciting prospect considering the current…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

The enormous surface area of the human intestinal barrier is key to maintaining a delicate physiological homeostasis. On one hand, it must be optimized for absorption of water and nutrients; on the other hand, it must act as a tight barrier against chemical and microbial challenges - all while protecting us from unnecessary reactions to compounds that are harmful to…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

The enormous surface area of the human intestinal barrier is key to maintaining a delicate physiological homeostasis. On one hand, it must be optimized for absorption of water and nutrients; on the other hand, it must act as a tight barrier against chemical and microbial challenges - all while protecting us from unnecessary reactions to compounds that are harmful to…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

Looking for a review that covers all the bases of probiotic health effects? A new, open access paper may serve that purpose. “Probiotics for human use” is a peer-reviewed paper published by the Nutrition Bulletin. This was a collaborative effort by experts in clinical effects (Prof. Dan Merenstein MD from Georgetown University, Claire Merrifield PhD from Imperial College London), fermented…

Mary Ellen Sanders
Mary Ellen Sanders is a consultant in the area of probiotic microbiology, with special expertise on paths to scientific substantiation of probiotic product label claims. Dr. Sanders served as the founding president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and is currently the organization’s Director of Scientific Affairs/ Executive Officer. This international, non-profit association of academic and industrial scientists is dedicated to advancing the science of probiotics and prebiotics (www.isapp.net). Through numerous written, oral and video pieces, including a website, www.usprobiotics.org, she strives to provide objective, evidence-based information on probiotics for consumers and professionals. Key activities include: Panels to determine GRAS status of probiotic strains ; member of the American Gastroenterological Association Scientific Advisory Board for AGA Center for Gut Microbiome Research and Education ; World Gastroenterology Organisation Committee preparing practice guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics for GI indications (2008, 2011, 2014) ; working group convened by the FAO/WHO that developed guidelines for probiotics (2002).

Looking for a review that covers all the bases of probiotic health effects? A new, open access paper may serve that purpose. “Probiotics for human use” is a peer-reviewed paper published by the Nutrition Bulletin. This was a collaborative effort by experts in clinical effects (Prof. Dan Merenstein MD from Georgetown University, Claire Merrifield PhD from Imperial College London), fermented…

Mary Ellen Sanders
Mary Ellen Sanders is a consultant in the area of probiotic microbiology, with special expertise on paths to scientific substantiation of probiotic product label claims. Dr. Sanders served as the founding president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and is currently the organization’s Director of Scientific Affairs/ Executive Officer. This international, non-profit association of academic and industrial scientists is dedicated to advancing the science of probiotics and prebiotics (www.isapp.net). Through numerous written, oral and video pieces, including a website, www.usprobiotics.org, she strives to provide objective, evidence-based information on probiotics for consumers and professionals. Key activities include: Panels to determine GRAS status of probiotic strains ; member of the American Gastroenterological Association Scientific Advisory Board for AGA Center for Gut Microbiome Research and Education ; World Gastroenterology Organisation Committee preparing practice guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics for GI indications (2008, 2011, 2014) ; working group convened by the FAO/WHO that developed guidelines for probiotics (2002).

The administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics is an important risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the Western world. Recent research has suggested that probiotics may help reduce the incidence of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) among children and adults in both hospital and outpatient settings. A new systematic review and meta-analysis, led by Dr. Bradley Johnston from Dealhousie University (Canada),…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics is an important risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the Western world. Recent research has suggested that probiotics may help reduce the incidence of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) among children and adults in both hospital and outpatient settings. A new systematic review and meta-analysis, led by Dr. Bradley Johnston from Dealhousie University (Canada),…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.