Pregnancy & early life

News Watch

Nearly 3.1 million children under five die every year due to poor nutrition, according to the World Food Programme, the world’s largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger. One in six infants (roughly 100 million) is underweight and the growth of 25% of children worldwide is stunted, a disabling consequence of malnutrition and frequent or persistent infections that undermine children's health and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Nearly 3.1 million children under five die every year due to poor nutrition, according to the World Food Programme, the world’s largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger. One in six infants (roughly 100 million) is underweight and the growth of 25% of children worldwide is stunted, a disabling consequence of malnutrition and frequent or persistent infections that undermine children's health and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

A baby’s diaper may not be the most pleasant thing to look at, but what it contains can provide doctors with a hint about whether that child may develop asthma later in life, thus allowing them to start treating him or her in order to prevent the disease. Researchers have found that four bacteria found in the faeces of a…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A baby’s diaper may not be the most pleasant thing to look at, but what it contains can provide doctors with a hint about whether that child may develop asthma later in life, thus allowing them to start treating him or her in order to prevent the disease. Researchers have found that four bacteria found in the faeces of a…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

What is the origin of our gut microbiota? How is it formed in newborns? How is it affected by breastfeeding? How does it evolve throughout our lifetime? You must have asked yourself these questions more than once... Well, during the 4th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2015, we had the opportunity to interview Professor Brent Polk, Chair of the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

What is the origin of our gut microbiota? How is it formed in newborns? How is it affected by breastfeeding? How does it evolve throughout our lifetime? You must have asked yourself these questions more than once... Well, during the 4th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2015, we had the opportunity to interview Professor Brent Polk, Chair of the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For some time, science has known that exposure to vaginal microbiota is crucial for newborn health. When babies pass through the birth canal, they get a healthy dose of the mother’s bacteria that helps them establish their own collection of microbes and turn on their immune system. However, stress during pregnancy may alter the mother’s microbiome and that can interfere…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For some time, science has known that exposure to vaginal microbiota is crucial for newborn health. When babies pass through the birth canal, they get a healthy dose of the mother’s bacteria that helps them establish their own collection of microbes and turn on their immune system. However, stress during pregnancy may alter the mother’s microbiome and that can interfere…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Digestion is extraordinarily complex, and there is a long list of ways it can go wrong. From constipation to bloating, digestive disorders can cause significant distress for infants and children as they develop. Fortunately, with emerging research on the microbiota, doctors, dietitians, and other healthcare professionals have a growing list of science-based strategies to use in addressing these problems. Healthcare…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Digestion is extraordinarily complex, and there is a long list of ways it can go wrong. From constipation to bloating, digestive disorders can cause significant distress for infants and children as they develop. Fortunately, with emerging research on the microbiota, doctors, dietitians, and other healthcare professionals have a growing list of science-based strategies to use in addressing these problems. Healthcare…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition characterized by systemic inflammation; it is one of the major contributors to neonatal mortality, especially in developing countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 1 million deaths per year (10% of all under-five mortality) are due to neonatal sepsis and that 42% of these deaths occur in the first week of life. Although exclusive…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition characterized by systemic inflammation; it is one of the major contributors to neonatal mortality, especially in developing countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 1 million deaths per year (10% of all under-five mortality) are due to neonatal sepsis and that 42% of these deaths occur in the first week of life. Although exclusive…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

To date, no effective strategy has been identified for reliably preventing the development of eczema and allergy in children at high risk of these conditions. Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is typically one of the first allergic manifestations to appear in infants predisposed to allergic disease. Thus, the condition is of particular interest when it comes to prevention. Since early life gut…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

To date, no effective strategy has been identified for reliably preventing the development of eczema and allergy in children at high risk of these conditions. Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is typically one of the first allergic manifestations to appear in infants predisposed to allergic disease. Thus, the condition is of particular interest when it comes to prevention. Since early life gut…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Previous research has shown antibiotics may increase the risk of immune-related diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by disturbing the composition and functions of the gut microbiota. Although the use of antibiotics during the peripartum period (including both the preterm and post-natal periods) has been suggested as a risk factor for IBD development later in life, little is known about…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown antibiotics may increase the risk of immune-related diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by disturbing the composition and functions of the gut microbiota. Although the use of antibiotics during the peripartum period (including both the preterm and post-natal periods) has been suggested as a risk factor for IBD development later in life, little is known about…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that the gut microbiome may modulate host metabolic health including the development of type 2 diabetes. However, little is known regarding the role of the gut microbiome in the aetiology of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), which is defined as “any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy”. A new study, led by…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that the gut microbiome may modulate host metabolic health including the development of type 2 diabetes. However, little is known regarding the role of the gut microbiome in the aetiology of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), which is defined as “any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy”. A new study, led by…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Gut microbial colonization during early life influences human development by triggering age-dependent immune mechanisms. Although considerable research effort has been made to understand microbial influences on health in early life, many of the processes through which microbial exposures facilitate immune system development remain to be identified. (Prof. Marie-Claire Arrieta) The GMFH publishing team is pleased to share a new summary…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut microbial colonization during early life influences human development by triggering age-dependent immune mechanisms. Although considerable research effort has been made to understand microbial influences on health in early life, many of the processes through which microbial exposures facilitate immune system development remain to be identified. (Prof. Marie-Claire Arrieta) The GMFH publishing team is pleased to share a new summary…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team