Nutrition

News Watch

Exercise is known to be essential for both our mental and our physical health. It is good for the heart, for keeping weight down and may help prevent some kinds of cancer; moreover, it can help keep our spirits up, as well as boosting our creativity and learning. According to a new study recently published in Gut, however, the benefits…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Exercise is known to be essential for both our mental and our physical health. It is good for the heart, for keeping weight down and may help prevent some kinds of cancer; moreover, it can help keep our spirits up, as well as boosting our creativity and learning. According to a new study recently published in Gut, however, the benefits…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The mix of bacteria that live in our gut changes throughout the year, to match the food we eat in every specific season. For example, bacteria that process fresh fruit and vegetables are more abundant in the summer, and those that process fats are mode abundant in winter times. A group of scientists at the University of Chicago has found…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The mix of bacteria that live in our gut changes throughout the year, to match the food we eat in every specific season. For example, bacteria that process fresh fruit and vegetables are more abundant in the summer, and those that process fats are mode abundant in winter times. A group of scientists at the University of Chicago has found…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The DNA of the microbes conserved on the fossilised teeth of our ancestors – specifically the ones from the bacteria calcified in their tartar or dental calculus – contains a lot of information about the microbiota inhabiting the guts of the civilisations that lived thousands of years ago. With this finding, we can now discover the effects of dietary changes…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The DNA of the microbes conserved on the fossilised teeth of our ancestors – specifically the ones from the bacteria calcified in their tartar or dental calculus – contains a lot of information about the microbiota inhabiting the guts of the civilisations that lived thousands of years ago. With this finding, we can now discover the effects of dietary changes…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Science has been showing for a while now that, in the long term, the saying ‘you are what you eat’ is true, or at least in terms of the composition of our gut microbiota. Until recently, however, we didn’t know how quickly the microbiota – or the hundreds of trillions of bacteria and microorganisms that live in our digestive system…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Science has been showing for a while now that, in the long term, the saying ‘you are what you eat’ is true, or at least in terms of the composition of our gut microbiota. Until recently, however, we didn’t know how quickly the microbiota – or the hundreds of trillions of bacteria and microorganisms that live in our digestive system…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Dr. Karen Scott, of the Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health at the University of Aberdeen (UK), tells us about probiotics and prebiotics and discusses what they are, how they differ from each other, how they alter our microbiota and the benefits they provide. “Most people know what a probiotic is, but there is a lot less understanding of prebiotics”,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Dr. Karen Scott, of the Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health at the University of Aberdeen (UK), tells us about probiotics and prebiotics and discusses what they are, how they differ from each other, how they alter our microbiota and the benefits they provide. “Most people know what a probiotic is, but there is a lot less understanding of prebiotics”,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

Previous research has shown that the severity of immunodeficiency in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is related to changes in both the gut virome and bacterial microbiome. Although microbiota-targeted interventions are considered nowadays a potential therapeutic strategy for HIV-infected subjects, little data is available regarding the efficacy of those interventions in humans. A new double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial, led by…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that the severity of immunodeficiency in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is related to changes in both the gut virome and bacterial microbiome. Although microbiota-targeted interventions are considered nowadays a potential therapeutic strategy for HIV-infected subjects, little data is available regarding the efficacy of those interventions in humans. A new double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial, led by…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The human gut microbiota composition and metabolic activities are modulated by the diet, and reciprocally, host metabolism and metabolites also interact with the gut microbiota and diet, shaping a complex interacting network that relates to gut health. Several factors can influence the human gut microbiota, with diet being a very important one. Not only dietary pattern (vegetarian vs. omnivorous dietary…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The human gut microbiota composition and metabolic activities are modulated by the diet, and reciprocally, host metabolism and metabolites also interact with the gut microbiota and diet, shaping a complex interacting network that relates to gut health. Several factors can influence the human gut microbiota, with diet being a very important one. Not only dietary pattern (vegetarian vs. omnivorous dietary…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

“Standing room only” was reported from the microbiome presentations at the recent Digestive Disease Week 2017 (#DDW17)—not an unusual circumstance at academic and medical conferences all around the world. And it’s no surprise that scientists and health professionals are keen to increase their knowledge, since microbiome-related diagnostics and interventions may soon add valuable tools to the arsenal of modern medicine.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

“Standing room only” was reported from the microbiome presentations at the recent Digestive Disease Week 2017 (#DDW17)—not an unusual circumstance at academic and medical conferences all around the world. And it’s no surprise that scientists and health professionals are keen to increase their knowledge, since microbiome-related diagnostics and interventions may soon add valuable tools to the arsenal of modern medicine.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Recent research has studied the role of the gut microbiome in modulating risk of several metabolic and immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune psoriasis and arthritis, and cancer. Although it is a well-known fact that diet is a major player in modulating both composition and function of the gut microbiome, little is known…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Recent research has studied the role of the gut microbiome in modulating risk of several metabolic and immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune psoriasis and arthritis, and cancer. Although it is a well-known fact that diet is a major player in modulating both composition and function of the gut microbiome, little is known…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) -including aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, indomethacin, and piroxicam, among others- constitute one of the most frequently prescribed types of drugs that often cause mucosal lesions, not only in the stomach/duodenum, but also in the small intestine. Although several novel treatments have been explored to prevent or reduce NSAID-induced intestinal lesions (i.e., gastrointestinal-sparing NSAIDs, anti-ulcer drugs, anti-secretory agents,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) -including aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, indomethacin, and piroxicam, among others- constitute one of the most frequently prescribed types of drugs that often cause mucosal lesions, not only in the stomach/duodenum, but also in the small intestine. Although several novel treatments have been explored to prevent or reduce NSAID-induced intestinal lesions (i.e., gastrointestinal-sparing NSAIDs, anti-ulcer drugs, anti-secretory agents,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados