Nutrition

News Watch

In the past decades, some studies have shed light on the importance of diet in reducing the risk of cancer. More and more evidence is accumulating that gut microbiota could be involved in this relationship between food and disease. A senior investigator at the National Cancer Institute (USA), Rashmi Sinha studies the link between what we eat, our health and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

In the past decades, some studies have shed light on the importance of diet in reducing the risk of cancer. More and more evidence is accumulating that gut microbiota could be involved in this relationship between food and disease. A senior investigator at the National Cancer Institute (USA), Rashmi Sinha studies the link between what we eat, our health and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Whether it's chicken soup to help fight a cold or garlic to fortify against the flu, tradition has it that food can influence our immune response. But does this idea hold up scientifically? According to Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK) and winner of the Danone International Prize for Nutrition, growing evidence shows…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Whether it's chicken soup to help fight a cold or garlic to fortify against the flu, tradition has it that food can influence our immune response. But does this idea hold up scientifically? According to Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK) and winner of the Danone International Prize for Nutrition, growing evidence shows…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

During the 5th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2016, held in Miami, we had the opportunity to talk to Francisco Guarner, group leader at the Unit of Intestinal Physiopathology at Vall d’Hebron Hospital (Barcelona) and member of the Gut Microbiota for Health Scientific Committee, and Gail Hecht, professor at the Department of Medicine at Loyola University Chicago and 2016…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

During the 5th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2016, held in Miami, we had the opportunity to talk to Francisco Guarner, group leader at the Unit of Intestinal Physiopathology at Vall d’Hebron Hospital (Barcelona) and member of the Gut Microbiota for Health Scientific Committee, and Gail Hecht, professor at the Department of Medicine at Loyola University Chicago and 2016…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Among the worst things about coming back to work after summer holidays is acknowledging you have gained some extra weight. Too much indulgence, you may guiltily think. But is that the whole story? According to new research published in the journal Nature, your gut microbiota might have had a role to play. Several studies have already linked changes in the…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Among the worst things about coming back to work after summer holidays is acknowledging you have gained some extra weight. Too much indulgence, you may guiltily think. But is that the whole story? According to new research published in the journal Nature, your gut microbiota might have had a role to play. Several studies have already linked changes in the…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

‘You are what you eat’ is something we have heard for years, and not only at the doctor’s office. Nevertheless, science is now backing this up – for example, just recently Dr. Gary Wu, of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, completed a study that supports this idea. Leading a team of researchers, Wu observed that…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

‘You are what you eat’ is something we have heard for years, and not only at the doctor’s office. Nevertheless, science is now backing this up – for example, just recently Dr. Gary Wu, of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, completed a study that supports this idea. Leading a team of researchers, Wu observed that…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Research & Practice

Previous evidence from both mouse models and humans has suggested that manipulation of the gut microbiota could help us understand how to deal with the current global obesity epidemic. However, whether the effects of targeting the gut microbiota are due to improved health status in people with overweight or obesity or the result of changes in their gut microbiota composition…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous evidence from both mouse models and humans has suggested that manipulation of the gut microbiota could help us understand how to deal with the current global obesity epidemic. However, whether the effects of targeting the gut microbiota are due to improved health status in people with overweight or obesity or the result of changes in their gut microbiota composition…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Human ageing is characterized by a chronic low-grade inflammation, termed “inflammaging”, that together with sarcopenia (muscle mass depletion and the reduction of muscle performance) and physical frailty (the loss of muscle performance and normal muscle mass) are significant risk factors for both morbidity and mortality in elderly people. Regarding the contribution of the aged gut microbiota in the host physiology,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Human ageing is characterized by a chronic low-grade inflammation, termed “inflammaging”, that together with sarcopenia (muscle mass depletion and the reduction of muscle performance) and physical frailty (the loss of muscle performance and normal muscle mass) are significant risk factors for both morbidity and mortality in elderly people. Regarding the contribution of the aged gut microbiota in the host physiology,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The Gut Microbiota for Health (GMFH) digital community was more active in 2017 than in any previous year—with over 50,000 scientists, healthcare professionals, and members of the public now taking part in the online conversation about gut microbiota! The website had over 950,000 visits this year, and was selected once again as one of Healthline's best gut health blogs. Among…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The Gut Microbiota for Health (GMFH) digital community was more active in 2017 than in any previous year—with over 50,000 scientists, healthcare professionals, and members of the public now taking part in the online conversation about gut microbiota! The website had over 950,000 visits this year, and was selected once again as one of Healthline's best gut health blogs. Among…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team
post_gut_microbiota_salt

Recent research has explored how specific dietary components such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates, probiotics and polyphenols interact with the gut microbiome to confer health benefits on the host. Although high salt content in the Western diet is a public health concern, as it has been linked with several cardiovascular-related disorders, little is known about whether the deleterious effects of a…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

post_gut_microbiota_salt

Recent research has explored how specific dietary components such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates, probiotics and polyphenols interact with the gut microbiome to confer health benefits on the host. Although high salt content in the Western diet is a public health concern, as it has been linked with several cardiovascular-related disorders, little is known about whether the deleterious effects of a…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Despite the widely known health benefits of whole grains in the diet, the mechanisms responsible for these benefits have remained elusive. The gut microbiome has been of particular interest, but previous studies have been inconclusive when it comes to identifying a consistent signature of whole grains on the gut microbiota. A new cross-over dietary intervention study has found that a…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Despite the widely known health benefits of whole grains in the diet, the mechanisms responsible for these benefits have remained elusive. The gut microbiome has been of particular interest, but previous studies have been inconclusive when it comes to identifying a consistent signature of whole grains on the gut microbiota. A new cross-over dietary intervention study has found that a…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter