Metabolic Conditions

News Watch

Since Dutchman Antony van Leeuwenhoek discovered bacteria and protozoa for the first time ever in history in the 17th century, much has been learnt about the microscopic world we live in and the one that lives inside us. Our microbiota, and specially our gut microbiota, have been studied intensely over the past 15 years. A huge amount of data is…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Since Dutchman Antony van Leeuwenhoek discovered bacteria and protozoa for the first time ever in history in the 17th century, much has been learnt about the microscopic world we live in and the one that lives inside us. Our microbiota, and specially our gut microbiota, have been studied intensely over the past 15 years. A huge amount of data is…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Akkermansia muciniphila. Despite the tricky moniker, keep this name in mind, because it is the next generation of promising probiotics coming from your gut microbiota. Yes, you have got it right. Recent studies have already shed light on the bunch of positive effects it has on our overall health. For instance, during the last Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Akkermansia muciniphila. Despite the tricky moniker, keep this name in mind, because it is the next generation of promising probiotics coming from your gut microbiota. Yes, you have got it right. Recent studies have already shed light on the bunch of positive effects it has on our overall health. For instance, during the last Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team is pleased to launch the first illustration of a brand new series of infographics, which will introduce some key microorganisms and cover more topics connected with the gut microbiota. Curious about how bifidobacteria were first discovered? Want to know what can they do for you, or how you can increase them? This infographic…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team is pleased to launch the first illustration of a brand new series of infographics, which will introduce some key microorganisms and cover more topics connected with the gut microbiota. Curious about how bifidobacteria were first discovered? Want to know what can they do for you, or how you can increase them? This infographic…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

If you are [a] zebra running for your life, or [a] lion sprinting for your next meal, you body's physiological response mechanisms are superbly adapted for dealing with such short-term physical emergencies... When we sit around and worry about stressful things, we turn on the same physiological responses—but they are potentially a disaster when provoked chronically. - Robert M. Sapolsky…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

If you are [a] zebra running for your life, or [a] lion sprinting for your next meal, you body's physiological response mechanisms are superbly adapted for dealing with such short-term physical emergencies... When we sit around and worry about stressful things, we turn on the same physiological responses—but they are potentially a disaster when provoked chronically. - Robert M. Sapolsky…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

It is not for no reason that increasing fibre in your diet is recommended.  Contained in fruits, legumes, veggies and whole grains, this carbohydrate helps keep you healthy, with its virtues backed up by scientific evidence: a diet rich in fibre reduces your risk of developing heart disease, diabetes and arthritis, among other things. Also, and more importantly, it seems…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

It is not for no reason that increasing fibre in your diet is recommended.  Contained in fruits, legumes, veggies and whole grains, this carbohydrate helps keep you healthy, with its virtues backed up by scientific evidence: a diet rich in fibre reduces your risk of developing heart disease, diabetes and arthritis, among other things. Also, and more importantly, it seems…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Research & Practice

Obesity is currently at pandemic proportions and not only impairs metabolic homeostasis, but is also a risk factor for psychological disorders including depression. Although the underlying mechanisms of these associations are largely unknown, alterations in the communication between the gastrointestinal tract and the nervous system (also called the gut-brain axis) could play a key role. A new study, led by…

Yolanda Sanz
Yolanda Sanz holds a PhD in Pharmacy and is Professor of the National Research Council (CSIC) at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) in Valencia, Spain. She is principal investigator of the Research Unit on Microbial Ecology, Nutrition and Health at IATA-CSIC. Her scientific field of interest is the role of the human microbiota in health and diseases, which affect the immune and neuroendocrine systems. Currently, she coordinates one of the largest EU projects on the human microbiome that integrates 30 partners of the EU and of USA, CA, NZ and AU (MyNewGut; www.mynewgut.eu). Her scientific contributions are reflected in more than 150 articles published in international peer-reviewed journals, 170 participations in conferences and eight patents.

Obesity is currently at pandemic proportions and not only impairs metabolic homeostasis, but is also a risk factor for psychological disorders including depression. Although the underlying mechanisms of these associations are largely unknown, alterations in the communication between the gastrointestinal tract and the nervous system (also called the gut-brain axis) could play a key role. A new study, led by…

Yolanda Sanz
Yolanda Sanz holds a PhD in Pharmacy and is Professor of the National Research Council (CSIC) at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) in Valencia, Spain. She is principal investigator of the Research Unit on Microbial Ecology, Nutrition and Health at IATA-CSIC. Her scientific field of interest is the role of the human microbiota in health and diseases, which affect the immune and neuroendocrine systems. Currently, she coordinates one of the largest EU projects on the human microbiome that integrates 30 partners of the EU and of USA, CA, NZ and AU (MyNewGut; www.mynewgut.eu). Her scientific contributions are reflected in more than 150 articles published in international peer-reviewed journals, 170 participations in conferences and eight patents.

Rural indigenous populations are nowadays used as a model for studying the current rise in chronic non-communicable diseases, especially obesity. This is down to the previous observation that these populations have the richest and most diverse microbiota ever recorded in humans, including microbial taxa that are absent in westernized populations. Two recent studies explore the impact on the gut microbiome…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Rural indigenous populations are nowadays used as a model for studying the current rise in chronic non-communicable diseases, especially obesity. This is down to the previous observation that these populations have the richest and most diverse microbiota ever recorded in humans, including microbial taxa that are absent in westernized populations. Two recent studies explore the impact on the gut microbiome…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has suggested the gut microbiota's role in the risk of developing metabolic and immune-related disorders later in life. However, no studies have characterized the early-life gut microbiome longitudinally in large populations. Three recent studies shed light on how early-life gut microbiota composition might help identify which children are at risk of developing obesity and type 1 diabetes later…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has suggested the gut microbiota's role in the risk of developing metabolic and immune-related disorders later in life. However, no studies have characterized the early-life gut microbiome longitudinally in large populations. Three recent studies shed light on how early-life gut microbiota composition might help identify which children are at risk of developing obesity and type 1 diabetes later…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The enormous surface area of the human intestinal barrier is key to maintaining a delicate physiological homeostasis. On one hand, it must be optimized for absorption of water and nutrients; on the other hand, it must act as a tight barrier against chemical and microbial challenges - all while protecting us from unnecessary reactions to compounds that are harmful to…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

The enormous surface area of the human intestinal barrier is key to maintaining a delicate physiological homeostasis. On one hand, it must be optimized for absorption of water and nutrients; on the other hand, it must act as a tight barrier against chemical and microbial challenges - all while protecting us from unnecessary reactions to compounds that are harmful to…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.