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I participated to the conference "Targeting Microbiota" to update my knowledge concerning the gut microbiota and to foster collaborations with other scientists in the field. It was also a great opportunity to present my ongoing work. This congress was scientifically very fruitful. I was impressed by the quality of the invited speakers. The congress covered a broad panel of pathologies…

Laure Bindels
I am a PharmD with a PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences. I did my PhD in nutrition and metabolism in the lab of Prof Delzenne (Université catholique de Louvain), working on the interest of gut microbiota modulation in the control of cancer progression and associated cachexia. I spent a year as a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (Prof Ramer-Tait and Prof Jens Walter) working on resistant starches and gut microbiota, where I acquired skills in gnotobiology and bioinformatics analysis. I am now a FNRS Postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Prof Delzenne.

I participated to the conference "Targeting Microbiota" to update my knowledge concerning the gut microbiota and to foster collaborations with other scientists in the field. It was also a great opportunity to present my ongoing work. This congress was scientifically very fruitful. I was impressed by the quality of the invited speakers. The congress covered a broad panel of pathologies…

Laure Bindels
I am a PharmD with a PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences. I did my PhD in nutrition and metabolism in the lab of Prof Delzenne (Université catholique de Louvain), working on the interest of gut microbiota modulation in the control of cancer progression and associated cachexia. I spent a year as a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (Prof Ramer-Tait and Prof Jens Walter) working on resistant starches and gut microbiota, where I acquired skills in gnotobiology and bioinformatics analysis. I am now a FNRS Postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Prof Delzenne.

In recent years, several studies reported a shift in the intestinal microbiota in humans and mice in response to high-fat diets. This shift is characterised by a reduction of Bacteroidetes and an increase of Firmicutes. The Erysipelotrichi, a bacterial class within the Firmicutes, was shown to be associated with symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, faecal transplantation transmitted the obese…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In recent years, several studies reported a shift in the intestinal microbiota in humans and mice in response to high-fat diets. This shift is characterised by a reduction of Bacteroidetes and an increase of Firmicutes. The Erysipelotrichi, a bacterial class within the Firmicutes, was shown to be associated with symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, faecal transplantation transmitted the obese…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

This comprehensive set of studies, by researchers in Israel, showed that intestinal microbiota in mice and humans show diurnal changes in composition and function. The changes happen on the scale of hours, and are influenced by the host's feeding rhythms. It is already known that chronic jet lag and shift work is associated with dysbiosis. Here, researchers induced jet lag…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

This comprehensive set of studies, by researchers in Israel, showed that intestinal microbiota in mice and humans show diurnal changes in composition and function. The changes happen on the scale of hours, and are influenced by the host's feeding rhythms. It is already known that chronic jet lag and shift work is associated with dysbiosis. Here, researchers induced jet lag…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The 2nd congress on targeting microbiota was held at Institut Pasteur in Paris on October 16-17, 2014. Professor Marvin Edeas, chairman of the scientific committee, warned the attendees about avoiding speculation where the challenge might be prevention instead of finding treatment. This should constitute a step "towards clinical revolution". To introduce this state of the art session, Pierre-Henri Gouyon, French National…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The 2nd congress on targeting microbiota was held at Institut Pasteur in Paris on October 16-17, 2014. Professor Marvin Edeas, chairman of the scientific committee, warned the attendees about avoiding speculation where the challenge might be prevention instead of finding treatment. This should constitute a step "towards clinical revolution". To introduce this state of the art session, Pierre-Henri Gouyon, French National…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Researchers from Israel recently published in Nature how NAS [Non-caloric artificial sweeteners] affect glucose tolerance. In an initial experiment, researchers found mice that consumed water, glucose, or sucrose had comparable glucose tolerance curves, but all 3 mouse groups consuming NAS (either saccharin, sucralose, or aspartame) developed marked glucose intolerance. They focused on saccharin for the next series of experiments, since…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Researchers from Israel recently published in Nature how NAS [Non-caloric artificial sweeteners] affect glucose tolerance. In an initial experiment, researchers found mice that consumed water, glucose, or sucrose had comparable glucose tolerance curves, but all 3 mouse groups consuming NAS (either saccharin, sucralose, or aspartame) developed marked glucose intolerance. They focused on saccharin for the next series of experiments, since…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team