Immune Health

News Watch

Whether it's chicken soup to help fight a cold or garlic to fortify against the flu, tradition has it that food can influence our immune response. But does this idea hold up scientifically? According to Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK) and winner of the Danone International Prize for Nutrition, growing evidence shows…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Whether it's chicken soup to help fight a cold or garlic to fortify against the flu, tradition has it that food can influence our immune response. But does this idea hold up scientifically? According to Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK) and winner of the Danone International Prize for Nutrition, growing evidence shows…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In the traditional view of your immune system, your body is a fortress that needs to be defended. You trust your immune system to be constantly on alert for enemies like harmful bacteria and viruses, and to be able to fight them off when they attack. But Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK)…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In the traditional view of your immune system, your body is a fortress that needs to be defended. You trust your immune system to be constantly on alert for enemies like harmful bacteria and viruses, and to be able to fight them off when they attack. But Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK)…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Around 20% of children population in Western countries have asthma, the most prevalent child chronic health condition. Worldwide, there are 235 million asthmatic people, according to World Health Organisation. Until now, the disease was associated to a combination of genetic and environmental factors, such as air pollution. Some recent studies had also demonstrated in animal models that an altered gut…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Around 20% of children population in Western countries have asthma, the most prevalent child chronic health condition. Worldwide, there are 235 million asthmatic people, according to World Health Organisation. Until now, the disease was associated to a combination of genetic and environmental factors, such as air pollution. Some recent studies had also demonstrated in animal models that an altered gut…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

The placenta is not a hermetic shelter as was once thought. Recent research shows it harbours a unique ecosystem of bacteria coming from the mother. And alterations of that microbial community, claims Kjersti Aagaard of Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston (USA), may lead some women to give birth prematurely. Aagaard investigates the impact of gestational…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

The placenta is not a hermetic shelter as was once thought. Recent research shows it harbours a unique ecosystem of bacteria coming from the mother. And alterations of that microbial community, claims Kjersti Aagaard of Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston (USA), may lead some women to give birth prematurely. Aagaard investigates the impact of gestational…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

‘You are what you eat’ is something we have heard for years, and not only at the doctor’s office. Nevertheless, science is now backing this up – for example, just recently Dr. Gary Wu, of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, completed a study that supports this idea. Leading a team of researchers, Wu observed that…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

‘You are what you eat’ is something we have heard for years, and not only at the doctor’s office. Nevertheless, science is now backing this up – for example, just recently Dr. Gary Wu, of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, completed a study that supports this idea. Leading a team of researchers, Wu observed that…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Research & Practice

Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundant antibody in mucosal secretions and has been recognized as a first line of defense in protecting the intestinal epithelium from enteric pathogens. Despite its important role in mucosal immunity and intestinal homeostasis, IgA deficiency—defined by undetectable seric IgA titers (<0.07 mg/ml) with normal IgG concentration—is related to a very mild phenotype in…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundant antibody in mucosal secretions and has been recognized as a first line of defense in protecting the intestinal epithelium from enteric pathogens. Despite its important role in mucosal immunity and intestinal homeostasis, IgA deficiency—defined by undetectable seric IgA titers (<0.07 mg/ml) with normal IgG concentration—is related to a very mild phenotype in…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Our gut microbiota may be involved in mediating interactions between the enteric nervous system and central nervous system (CNS) through the gut-brain axis. The impact of commensal gut microbes on CNS functions have been studied mostly in mice. As such, the antibiotic-induced CNS consequences of manipulating humans' gut microbiota are still unknown. A new double-blinded randomized study led by our…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Our gut microbiota may be involved in mediating interactions between the enteric nervous system and central nervous system (CNS) through the gut-brain axis. The impact of commensal gut microbes on CNS functions have been studied mostly in mice. As such, the antibiotic-induced CNS consequences of manipulating humans' gut microbiota are still unknown. A new double-blinded randomized study led by our…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) represents a major healthcare concern that causes diarrhea and usually affects people who have recently been treated with antibiotics or have had an extended stay in a healthcare setting. It can also spread easily to others. Although previous experimental research has shown that a fiber-deprived diet leads to a disturbed host colonic epithelium and has an…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) represents a major healthcare concern that causes diarrhea and usually affects people who have recently been treated with antibiotics or have had an extended stay in a healthcare setting. It can also spread easily to others. Although previous experimental research has shown that a fiber-deprived diet leads to a disturbed host colonic epithelium and has an…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Regular and adequate levels of physical exercise help protect against several diseases and all-cause mortality. One of the mechanisms that has been gaining increasing attention in relation to how exercise impacts health outcomes is the favorable modification of the human gut microbiota. Although research in this field is still scarce, previous animal and human research findings showed that exercise can…

Stéphane Schneider
Professor Stéphane Schneider heads the Nutritional Support Unit in the Gastroenterology and Nutrition Department Archet University Hospital in Nice (France). He is also head of the Nice University Hospital’s food-nutrition liaison committee. Dr. Schneider is vice-president of the French-Speaking Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP), and chairs the Educational and Clinical Practice Committee of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Three years after receiving his M.D. in Gastroenterology from the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, he became an assistant Professor and later a full Professor of Nutrition. He is also certified by the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He obtained a Master of Science from the University of Paris VII, and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University Paul Cezanne, as well as a CME Diploma from Harvard Medical School. His main research interests are intestinal failure and the effects of aging and chronic diseases on nutritional status. He has published 188 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, with an h index of 37. His goal is to help understand better the role of the intestinal ecosystem, as well as the effects of different forms of bacteriotherapy, in digestive and non-digestive disorders featuring dysbiosis.

Regular and adequate levels of physical exercise help protect against several diseases and all-cause mortality. One of the mechanisms that has been gaining increasing attention in relation to how exercise impacts health outcomes is the favorable modification of the human gut microbiota. Although research in this field is still scarce, previous animal and human research findings showed that exercise can…

Stéphane Schneider
Professor Stéphane Schneider heads the Nutritional Support Unit in the Gastroenterology and Nutrition Department Archet University Hospital in Nice (France). He is also head of the Nice University Hospital’s food-nutrition liaison committee. Dr. Schneider is vice-president of the French-Speaking Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP), and chairs the Educational and Clinical Practice Committee of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Three years after receiving his M.D. in Gastroenterology from the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, he became an assistant Professor and later a full Professor of Nutrition. He is also certified by the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He obtained a Master of Science from the University of Paris VII, and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University Paul Cezanne, as well as a CME Diploma from Harvard Medical School. His main research interests are intestinal failure and the effects of aging and chronic diseases on nutritional status. He has published 188 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, with an h index of 37. His goal is to help understand better the role of the intestinal ecosystem, as well as the effects of different forms of bacteriotherapy, in digestive and non-digestive disorders featuring dysbiosis.

Although intake of certain non-antibiotic drugs -antidiabetics such as metformin and acarbose, proton pump inhibitors, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and second-generation antipsychotics, opioids and statins- that target human cells have been related to changes in the gut microbiome composition, little is known regarding the extent to which this happens for a broader range of drugs. A recent study, led by Dr.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although intake of certain non-antibiotic drugs -antidiabetics such as metformin and acarbose, proton pump inhibitors, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and second-generation antipsychotics, opioids and statins- that target human cells have been related to changes in the gut microbiome composition, little is known regarding the extent to which this happens for a broader range of drugs. A recent study, led by Dr.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados